Hoof Stands and Farrier Supplies from Barn World

 

    Barn World

 

Hoof Stands from Barn World

 

At Barn World, we’ve come across a lot of great products and one that has stood out  with it’s ability and ease of use is the Hoof-It hoof stand.  Whether working on a large draft horse hoof, a standard horse hoof  or small hoofed animals such as ponies, smaller horse breeds and older horses, there is a hoof stand available to make the back breaking chore of trimming a hoof much, much easier.

The HOOF-it®  Hoof Stand, designed by farrier Steve Samet, features a new modern design which integrates the post and cradle to create a “two-in-one” unit. This combo design allows the user to easily switch from the standard hoof cradle to the draft cradle in order to work on and shoe a wide range of hoof sizes.

The cradle and post are covered with a shock-absorbing rubber material that provides a comfortable support for the horse, while the wide base unit provides added stability and safety for the user.

The hoof stands are available in three sizes and in a combination stand:

Please check out the instructional hoof stand video below to see just how easy working on a hoof can be with the hoof stand.

 

 

The HOOF-it® ‘All in One’ Hoof Stand

Hoof care the easy & comfortable way! Easy on the horse and the user, the Hoof-it® Stand gives you both the post and cradle integrated into one, innovative hoof stand. Do yourself a favor! Take the pain out of your back and knees with the New Hoof Stand from HOOF-it® Technologies

The HOOF-it® ‘All in One’ Hoof Stand, designed by Farrier Steve Samet, features a shock absorbing, integrated rubber cradle and hoof post into one easy to use unit.

The Hoof Stand provides a stable and safe support for the horse, allowing it to relax without putting all of it’s weight on you.

For additional safety and stability when working with the Hoof-it®Stand try the following:

* keep on foot on the base unit when working with the Hoof® Stand

* do not leave the horses leg or hoof in the cradle or on the stand, when unattended.

Benefits for Farrier’s, Veterinarians and horse Owners who use the HOOF-it® Hoof Stand:

√ Easy to use “All in One” innovative, design integrates both the post and cradle in to one.

√ The innovative design of the HOOF-it® Hoof Stand dramatically reduces your risk of getting injured during hoof care tasks.

√ The HOOF-it Stand is ideally suited for use with all types of horses, including older horses that require special support and comfort during hoof care tasks.

√ The rubber cushioned Cradle fits different hoof sizes and hugs the hoof.

Let HOOF-it® Hoof Stand deal with the majority of the horses weight during any type of hoof care tasks, rather than your back or knees.

Visit www.BarnWorld.com today to see all of Barn World’s farrier supplies and livestock supplies.

 

 

Cattle Guards HS20 from Barn World

BarnWorld.com

 

HS20 Cattle Guards are rated for road construction projects and public highways.

Barn World has a large selection to choose from and also carries more economical cattle guards for use on  private property.

Cattle Guards – Rated
Available in four different certified load ratings, these cattle guards are intended for use on public highways and heavy off-road equipment.
The American Association of State Highway Transportation Officials (AASHTO) provides guidelines for cattle guards with maximum load ratings. AASHTO load ratings are suitable for all types of applications including heavy duty logging roads.

AASHTO Design Specifications

Our HS20 rated cattle guards are made from schedule 40 steel and come in a variety of sizes to fit various cattle guard projects. We can alter the design of our cattle guards to use different kinds of pipe and rail depending on your needs. We have used round pipe, square rail, I-beam and other types of rail and channel to make rated cattle guards that are suitable for all public crossings.

Barn World HS20 rated cattle guards conform to AASHTO load rating requirement by type of truck and maximum axle load. Our rated cattle guards come with an engineer’s stamp and are certified to meet the AASHTO load ratings so you can feel confident that you are getting the best quality cattle guard.

We also offer a new ATV cattle guard for crossing fence lines on an ATV.

 

Call or visit Barn World for help with your cattle guard projects or to get quotes on HS20 rated cattle guards.

BarnWorld

720-238-2190.

 

Farrier Supplies: Hoof Stands – a real back saver. Hoof Stands for Horses of all sizes at Barn World!

 

Barn World

 

Hoof Stands from Barn World

 

At Barn World, we’ve come across a lot of great products and one that has stood out  with it’s ability and ease of use is the Hoof-It hoof stand.  Whether working on a large draft horse hoof, a standard horse hoof  or small hoofed animals such as ponies, smaller horse breeds and older horses, there is a hoof stand available to make the back breaking chore of trimming a hoof much, much easier.

The HOOF-it®  Hoof Stand, designed by farrier Steve Samet, features a new modern design which integrates the post and cradle to create a “two-in-one” unit. This combo design allows the user to easily switch from the standard hoof cradle to the draft cradle in order to work on and shoe a wide range of hoof sizes.

The cradle and post are covered with a shock-absorbing rubber material that provides a comfortable support for the horse, while the wide base unit provides added stability and safety for the user.

The hoof stands are available in three sizes and in a combination stand:

Please check out the instructional hoof stand video below to see just how easy working on a hoof can be with the hoof stand.

 

Hoof Stands

The HOOF-it® ‘All in One’ Hoof Stand

Hoof care the easy & comfortable way! Easy on the horse and the user, the Hoof-it® Stand gives you both the post and cradle integrated into one, innovative hoof stand. Do yourself a favor! Take the pain out of your back and knees with the New Hoof Stand from HOOF-it® Technologies

The HOOF-it® ‘All in One’ Hoof Stand, designed by Farrier Steve Samet, features a shock absorbing, integrated rubber cradle and hoof post into one easy to use unit.

The Hoof Stand provides a stable and safe support for the horse, allowing it to relax without putting all of it’s weight on you.

For additional safety and stability when working with the Hoof-it®Stand try the following:

* keep on foot on the base unit when working with the Hoof® Stand

* do not leave the horses leg or hoof in the cradle or on the stand, when unattended.

Benefits for Farrier’s, Veterinarians and horse Owners who use the HOOF-it® Hoof Stand:

√ Easy to use “All in One” innovative, design integrates both the post and cradle in to one.

√ The innovative design of the HOOF-it® Hoof Stand dramatically reduces your risk of getting injured during hoof care tasks.

√ The HOOF-it Stand is ideally suited for use with all types of horses, including older horses that require special support and comfort during hoof care tasks.

√ The rubber cushioned Cradle fits different hoof sizes and hugs the hoof.

Let HOOF-it® Hoof Stand deal with the majority of the horses weight during any type of hoof care tasks, rather than your back or knees.

Visit www.BarnWorld.com today to see all of Barn World’s farrier supplies and livestock supplies.

Mineral Feeders and Mineral Licks – an important component to keeping your livestock healthy year-round

Here is a great article from Working Ranch about the importance of getting your livestock the minerals they need during the winter months. and the attention to the type of supplement quality and quantity.

Barn World’s carries a large selection of troughs and grain feeders to help keep your livestock healthy.

Barn World also carries a large selection of mineral feeders and mineral licks to help ensure the proper nutrients are a part of the diet.   A mineral feeder is an important part of facilitating the absorption of minerals.

From ground mineral feeders like the Dura Life to the wind vane style mineral feeders like the upright mineral feeder, Barn World has the tools to make sure your animals remain healthy all season long.

 

 

Make sure your cows are nutritionally ready

From Working Ranch

– by Gilda V. Bryant

– photo by Lucie Wiese


Minerals are important for herd health, reproduction and efficiency during winter. However, that is only part of the picture.  Extra protein and energy are vital during cold, wet weather.  Producers should also be aware of forage and by-product supplementation quality, as well as body condition scores.

“The challenge with minerals is there’s just no single answer,” says Rick Rasby, PhD, PAS (Professional Animal Scientist), Beef Extension Specialist, University of Nebraska (Lincoln).  “Think about minerals as part of a total diet those animals are eating.”

Rasby encourages producers to sample baled forages for moisture content, protein, energy and mineral profiles.  Once a producer knows his forage quality, he can adjust the mineral package for his herd.  He says, “Use the mineral as a supplement to bridge the deficiency gap in those forages that are being consumed.”

He also recommends that producers analyze samples of supplemental feed such as gin trash, cotton seed, or distiller’s grains.

Many regions with ethanol plants have distiller’s grains available for the cow/calf sector.  Rasby says, “It’s an excellent feed, works well with forages, and is high in protein, energy and phosphorus as well.”

Typically low in winter forages, phosphorus is a mineral that’s vital for bone and teeth development, and metabolic, neurological and cellular functions in cattle.  It’s also one of the most expensive minerals to supplement.  According to Rasby, reducing or omitting phosphorus from the mineral package when feeding distillers grains can save money.  Get advice from a nutritionist or beef extension specialist about adjusting nutrient values when feeding these supplemental rations.

In addition to minerals, protein and energy, utilizing body condition scores (BCS) is a management practice that cow/calf operators can implement on a regular basis. Scores range between one and nine with one being a very poor specimen and nine being obese.

Rasby adds, “Having mature cows in condition score five at calving not only has an impact on what happens at calving, but also on how quickly those cows are ready to rebreed after calving.  Those first-calf heifers probably need to be in a little bit better condition, say conditioning score six.

“Cows that breed early in the breeding season are in the right nutritional status.  Their calves are older at weaning and generate more dollars,” explains Rasby.

Is it right?

How can a cattleman determine if his mineral supplement and diet are on target? “Measure how they perform at calving,” replies Rasby.  “Are they good mothers?  Do they give enough milk? Does the calf perform well while it’s on its mother?  How quickly does the cow get ready to rebreed?”

Providing minerals is crucial to the Thomas Angus Ranch outside of Baker City, Oregon. Located in a valley between two mountain ranges, and flanked by sagebrush hills, owner Rob Thomas says, “We have long, fairly hard winters.”

He provides a custom mineral mix to his spring and fall calving herds, depending on forage analysis to fine-tune the supplement package.  Thomas says, “We increased levels of zinccopper, and selenium, the three minerals we’re deficient in.”

Beginning in November when snow is on the ground, he’ll feed alfalfa and grass hay.  He says, “We put up a lot of our own hay, so we feed what we put up.  We test our feed to see what minerals we need.”

As a result of their efforts he reports, “We have healthier cattle, better immune response, fewer treatments and a lower death loss.  We see increases in reproduction and gain and better feed utilization, which is important right now.  With extremely high feed prices, we want to utilize every bit of that feed, if possible.”

Across the country, Kevin Yon raises Angus cattle in the mild winters of west central South Carolina.  He provides three mineral mixes: summer, winter, and one for young growing livestock.  Yon says, “Our winter mineral program doesn’t differ drastically from our summer mineral program.  We include a higher level of magnesium to prevent grass tetany.  If all goes well we hope to have lush grazing on a limited basis, even in December and for sure in February and March.”

His winter diet includes stockpiled forages such as Fescue or Bermuda grass.  When possible, Yon likes to have rye grass or small-grain winter annuals on hand.  He explains, “It could be a combination of those and sometimes we’ll use a protein or energy supplement, which could be commodity by-products, such as whole cotton seed, dried distillers grains or corn gluten.”

He analyzes feed, grains and commodity by-products, seeking advice from a nutritionist to adjust his mineral program as needed.

“It’s important to have a year-round high-quality mineral program,” Yon advises. “That’s not always the cheapest bag of mineral, but it has the high levels that are needed for cattle in your area.  The cheapest bag is not always the best.”

Yon finds that his cattle have a more consistent consumption if he allows free choice at all times.  He says, “Know what the consumption rate should be and monitor that. In our part of the world, a covered mineral trough is important so the mineral doesn’t get wet, cake up and the cattle don’t eat it.

“As a producer, I see the benefit of minerals.” Yon explains, “The biggest for us is reproduction, cow herd efficiency, immune response, cattle health, and growth and development.  At our place we try to feed a cow as cheap as we can because 60-70 percent of our annual cost involves nutrition.  We don’t see that minerals are the place to skimp.”

Thomas also recommends feeding minerals, saying, “Do it based on science.  Go ahead and get a forage analysis based on what you’re feeding and do that every time you get a new batch of feed, so you know what you’re feeding and what minerals you need to add to the ration.”

Rasby says, “To be competitive, you’re really going to have to watch feed costs. How you put together feeding programs to meet your herd’s nutritional needs is going to be critical.”

To find a list of certified feed testing laboratories, check out: www.foragetesting.org.

 


PROTEIN AND ENERGY

“Minerals don’t do much if you’re not doing a good job of covering your water, energy, and protein needs for those cows,” advises Ken Bryan, PAS, and Ruminant Specialist with Cargill.  “A balanced diet is important because you have the added stress of environmental conditions like cold, wet weather, mud and wind, which are going to increase the cow’s nutritional requirements.”

Adequate amounts of energy and protein are critical during winter conditions. “If a cow will eat twenty-four pounds of dry matter in forage, she’s going to get all the energy she needs,” Bryan explains.  “If that rumen is functioning well, she’ll break down the fiber and utilize that feed.  That’s your energy source.”

Protein, a much-needed nutrient in cattle diets, is composed of true protein andnonprotein nitrogen.  Protein in forages will gradually decline, providing less protein as winter progresses, with a higher percentage of fiber.  “The nasty thing about fiber is a high fiber, low quality forage diet will restrict intake,” Bryan says.  “Now we’re going to supplement with a protein source.  The nice thing is, there are options for protein supplementation.”

“There’s the old standby, cake or range cubes, protein tubs or blocks and leftovers from oil seed products such as sunflower, cotton seed, or soybean meal and distillers grains from corn.  Look at the most economical way to deliver protein to the cow.”

Bryan cautions, “We’ve got to keep a minimum amount of fiber in that diet as we feed energy supplements.  We’re going to cause some long- term changes in that cow’s rumen… we’ll ruin her if we feed her like a feedlot steer.”

Hoof Care and Maintenance Kit from Barn World



BarnWorld.com

Livestock Supplies

Hoof Care and Hoof Maintenance

 


The Hoof-it Maintenance Kit is a great hoof care kit that makes hoof care a breeze.  Hoof maintenance and hoof care for farriers and horse lovers alike and is an easy way to care for your equine and livestock hoofs.

See how simple it is in the following video:

From the video:

Hoof Care and Maintenance Kit:

The Hoof Care and Maintenance Kit is a three step system.

  1. apply sanitizer:  apply sanitizer to the hoof to eliminate any bacteria or thrush
  2. apply conditioner:  apply conditioner to strengthen and condition the hoof
  3. apply the hoof strengthener:  the hoof stengthener will act as a clear coat to protect the hoof.  It will also leave the hoof with a nice shiny the gloss.

This very simple and effective system is a surefire way to keep your hoofs healthy and looking good.

Visit Barn World today for all your farrier supplies and needs and remember, we carry a large supply of livestock, farm and ranch supplies.  Barn World offers everything from saddle pads to cattle guards.

Call 720.238.2190 or visit www.BarnWorld.com today!

 

 

Cattle Guards from Barn World – The rated cattle guard HS20 for public roadways

BarnWorld.com

 

 

Barn World carries rated cattle guards for public highways and road construction project in addition to private property use cattle guards.

Rated Cattle Guards
Rated Cattle Guards are available in four different certified load ratings. These cattle guards are intended for use on public highways or for heavy off-road equipment.
The American Association of State Highway Transportation Officials (AASHTO) provides guidelines for cattle guards with maximum load ratings. AASHTO load ratings are suitable for all types of applications including heavy duty logging roads.

AASHTO Design Specifications

  • H-15 (12 tons per axle)
  • H-20 (16 tons per axle)
  • U-54 (25 tons per axle)
  • U-80 (30 tons per axle)
  • Our HS20 rated cattle guards are made from schedule 40 steel and come in a variety of sizes to fit various cattle guard projects. We can alter the design of our cattle guards to use different kinds of pipe and rail depending on your needs. We have used round pipe, square rail, I-beam and other types of rail and channel to make rated cattle guards that are suitable for all public crossings.

     

    Barn World HS20 rated cattle guards conform to AASHTO load rating requirement by type of truck and maximum axle load. Our rated cattle guards come with an engineer’s stamp and are certified to meet the AASHTO load ratings so you can feel confident that you are getting the best quality cattle guard.

    We also offer a new ATV cattle guard for crossing fence lines on an ATV.

    Call Barn World with your questions and plans to get quotes on HS20 rated cattle guards at 720-238-2190.

     

    Hoof Stands from Barn World – A hoof stand will save a farrier’s back and yours!

     

    Barn World

     

    Hoof Stands from Barn World

     

    At Barn World, we come across a lot of great products and one that has stood out  with it’s ability and ease of use is the Hoof-It hoof stand.  Whether working on a large draft horse hoof, a standard horse hoof  or small hoofed animals such as ponies, smaller horse breeds and older horses, there is a hoof stand available to make the back breaking chore of trimming a hoof much, much easier.

    The HOOF-it®  Hoof Stand, designed by farrier Steve Samet, features a new modern design which integrates the post and cradle to create a “two-in-one” unit. This combo design allows the user to easily switch from the standard hoof cradle to the draft cradle in order to work on and shoe a wide range of hoof sizes.

    The cradle and post are covered with a shock-absorbing rubber material that provides a comfortable support for the horse, while the wide base unit provides added stability and safety for the user.

    The hoof stands are available in three sizes and in a combination stand:

    Please check out the instructional hoof stand video below to see just how easy working on a hoof can be with the hoof stand.

     

    The HOOF-it® ‘All in One’ Hoof Stand

    Hoof care the easy & comfortable way! Easy on the horse and the user, the Hoof-it® Stand gives you both the post and cradle integrated into one, innovative hoof stand. Do yourself a favor! Take the pain out of your back and knees with the New Hoof Stand from HOOF-it® Technologies

    The HOOF-it® ‘All in One’ Hoof Stand, designed by Farrier Steve Samet, features a shock absorbing, integrated rubber cradle and hoof post into one easy to use unit.
    The Hoof Stand provides a stable and safe support for the horse, allowing it to relax without putting all of it’s weight on you.

    For additional safety and stability when working with the Hoof-it®Stand try the following:
    * keep on foot on the base unit when working with the Hoof® Stand
    * do not leave the horses leg or hoof in the cradle or on the stand, when unattended.

    Benefits for Farrier’s, Veterinarians and horse Owners who use the HOOF-it® Hoof Stand:

    √ Easy to use “All in One” innovative, design integrates both the post and cradle in to one.

    √ The innovative design of the HOOF-it® Hoof Stand dramatically reduces your risk of getting injured during hoof care tasks.

    √ The HOOF-it Stand is ideally suited for use with all types of horses, including older horses that require special support and comfort during hoof care tasks.

    √ The rubber cushioned Cradle fits different hoof sizes and hugs the hoof.

    Let HOOF-it® Hoof Stand deal with the majority of the horses weight during any type of hoof care tasks, rather than your back or knees.

    Visit www.BarnWorld.com today to see all of Barn World’s farrier supplies and livestock supplies.


    Hay Feeders – Texas drought makes hay feeders ever so important

     

    The extreme Texas drought has made hay feeders even more important than ever.  Given the extreme conditions and the lack of natural hay and even the lack of hay from neighboring states available to be trucked in, it has become a necessity to have hay feeders that eliminate any kind of waste.

     

    Barn World has a large selection of hay feeders that minimize waste and maximize the amount of hay that gets to your herd.  Please view our large hay feeder selection online to minimize the cost of feed and help eliminate any possibility of  selling out any livestock.

     

    We have a great selection of combo hay feeders, standard bale feeders, portable hay feeders and stall feeders.  In fact, visit BarnWorld for all of your livestock equipment and livestock supply needs.

     

    Below is a succinct  article from Progressive Cattleman detailing the severity of the drought Texas is dealing with.  We hope that it ends soon and the herds get back to normal quickly.

    Texas crop, weather: It’s a ‘no-brain-er;’ sell out herds now!

    Tuesday, 16 August 2011 14:10
    Written by Tony Okon – Progressive Cattleman
     

    COLEGE STATION – With little to no grazing and hay, should livestock producers continue to try to buy feed, move cattle to another state or just sell out?

     

    “It would be much less expensive to just get out and come back later,” said Dr. Larry Redmon, Texas AgriLife Extension Service state forage specialist. “And that’s the message that we’re trying to convey.”

    Many livestock producers have already tried to cut feeding costs by extensively culling their herds, but have held onto enough cows to rebuild their herds if the drought passes, he said.

    In some dry years, that might be a good strategy, but not this one, Redmon said.

    “It’s unprecedented,” he said. “(We’ve had) the 12 driest months in Texas history, and there’s just not many ways to combat that.”

    With grazing and hay supplies next to non-existent in many areas of the state, it’s getting very expensive to buy feed. On average, it’s costing producers “somewhere around a $100 a month to have these animals (cows) stay in the pasture and feed them,” he said.

    Another choice is to move cattle elsewhere, most likely another state during this drought, and lease land where there is grazing, Redmon said.

    “It could be western Mississippi; it could be eastern Louisiana; or it could be maybe Missouri,” he said. ‘I haven’t talked to anybody this year, but in the past couple of years people have called me from other states and they’ve quoted prices of $20 to $22 per (cow/calf) pair per month. Even assuming that’s $25 or $30 that’s still a far, far cry from $100 a month.”

    Of course, one has to add the cost of hauling a trailer load of cattle to the leased grazing, but even with that added cost it still cheaper than trying to buy hay and feed at today’s prices, he said.

    “It’s probably going to be $3 to $3.50 a loaded mile –something like that,” he said. “If you just put all that together … the savings could still be tremendous if a person could find a place to put those animals.”

    But completely selling out makes more sense yet, Redmon said, given there’s no guarantee this drought will end anytime soon.

    “Some people would counter and say it’ll cost more to come back into the business later because conditions will have improved, and more people will be getting back in,” he said. “That’s true. But again, looking at the difference in what it would cost to buy cows and come back in at some later date — versus what they would spend trying to go through this drought — mathematically, it’s just a no-brainer.”

    More information on the current Texas drought and wildfire alerts can be found on the AgriLife Extension Agricultural Drought Task Force website athttp://agrilife.tamu.edu/drought/.

    AgriLife Extension district reporters compiled the following summaries:

    Central: Northern parts of the district received from 2 to 5 inches of rain, but conditions remained largely unchanged. Sale barns were full each Saturday. Cattle were getting thin. All livestock producers were heavily feeding. Hay and water was in short supply. Farmers continued to harvest crops worth harvesting. Many crops were being zeroed-out for insurance purposes.

    Coastal Bend: Though light showers were reported in some areas, extreme drought conditions persisted. The cotton harvest was ongoing. Livestock producers continued to sell off herds due to lack of forage. Most watering ponds were dry. Some water wells were also going dry, and some producers were drilling new ones. Many trees were dying or showing signs of drought stress.

    East: No rain was received, and the drought worsened. Water levels in stock ponds and creeks were dangerously low. Many trees were dying or going dormant early. Hay was no longer being harvested. Producers were searching for hay to buy. Out-of-state purchases were becoming more common. Ranchers continued culling and selling off herds. Livestock began to show signs of obvious weight-loss.

    North: Soil moisture was very short over most of the area. Daytime highs of 100-plus degrees and nighttime lows in the mid-80s continued to be the norm. A few areas received some rain, which might improve pastures if they are not overgrazed and given time to regrow. Without rain, most pastures continued to go downhill. The corn and grain sorghum harvests were nearly complete with yields reported to be slightly above average. Soybeans – those that survived the drought — were also being harvested. Some soybeans were cut for hay and the rest were being plowed under. Corn and milo stalks were being harvested as hay and shipped all over the state. Where there was hay, it was being sold before it was cut. Once baled, hay was being loaded on trucks and shipped out before the baler got cold. Most livestock producers were feeding hay and supplements to cattle. With heavy supplemental feeding and short hay supplies, producers continued to cull their herds and were scrambling to find hay for immediate feeding and for winter. Some livestock producers were selling out. Water was becoming a major concern as ponds were getting very low. Hay producers hoped for late August or September rains so they could possibly produce one more cutting. Trees were dying from the record heat and lack of rain for over 60 days in most areas. Rangeland and pasture conditions were very poor.

    Panhandle: Most of the region received scattered showers and cooler weather. Accumulations ranged from a trace to 1.5 inches. The rain and cooler weather was welcomed, but it was not enough moisture to help the very thirsty crops. Soil moisture levels remained very short. Irrigators were watering full swing trying to keep up with water demands. Gray County received hail along with the rain, which stripped the leaves off some cotton and corn. Also, high winds toppled six pivots in that county. The rain greened up some pastures, but more was needed to really make a difference in the very poor conditions. However, the cooler weather did ease water needs and heat stress on cattle. Supplemental feeding of livestock continued. Producers who were trying to hang on to their cattle were buying hay form other states, with hauling costs running $20-$30 per ton.

    Rolling Plains: Rain! But the amount varied greatly from county to county. Throckmorton County received from 0.5 inch to 3 inches of rain, while Stephens County received from 0.5 inch to 5 inches. Haskell County received as much as 2.8 inches. Other counties received from 0.1 to 0.8 inch. However, the majority of counties did not receive any measurable moisture. The rain was no help for cotton producers, though it did help wheat growers who would like to plant in September. More moderate temperatures, especially nighttime lows, helped relieve stress on livestock. Cotton was fruiting, but even under heavy watering, fields still looked weak. Producers were weaning and selling calves. Some producers are selling or shipping their cows to out-of-state grazing. Hay was scarce and expensive when available. A few hay producers hoped to have a late-summer cutting. Large trees were beginning to show the effects of too little moisture.

    South: Record-high temperatures continued. In Webb County, temperatures of 104 and higher were reported. Some daytime highs reached 108 or even 110 degrees. Rangeland and pastures further declined, forage supplies and stock-tank water levels dropped. Many livestock water tanks had already completely dried out. In Live Oak County, there were record numbers of livestock sales at sale barns. The heaviest livestock culling was taking place in Webb and Zavala counties, where ranchers have completely run out of water resources. Also, feed sources in those counties were very scarce. The western portion of Frio County received 0.5 to 1 inch of rain. Also in that Frio County, the corn harvest was completed, the cotton harvest began and the sorghum harvest was ongoing. Most crops in Jim Wells County were harvested, and fields were ready for fall and winter preparations. In Zavala County, farmers were preparing land for cabbage and spinach planting, and pecan producers were irrigating orchards in the critical kernel-development stage. In Hidalgo County, the cotton harvesting was winding down. In Starr County, farmers were planting sugarcane and fall vegetables. In Willacy County, harvesting of late-planted cotton continued.

    South Plains: Some areas received as much as 3 inches of rain. Others got none. The remaining cotton is from two weeks to a month ahead of schedule; and the final stages of flowering or in cut-out. In other areas, cotton was shedding bolls and squares from lack of water. Of the 42,000 cotton acres planted in Garza County, only 8,000 remained. Many producers were planning on an early harvest. High temperatures dropped into the 90s. Most counties were still under burn bans. Some growers chose to dig and harvest peanut vines for hay due to the low pegging rate. White grapes in Yoakum County were harvested, and red grapes were expected to be ready by the end of August. Cattle producers were selling off herds because of shortages of grass, hay and water.

    Southeast: The extreme drought did not budge. The month of July closed with a nearly 22-inch rainfall deficit for the year in some parts of the region. Some areas had scattered showers. Grain sorghum and rice fields were being baled and sold for livestock forage. Early July had brought some light rains that allowed for re-growth of grain sorghum. But tests showed very high prussic acid levels. People feeding this forage to livestock were cautioned to test all sorghum grass species before grazing or feeding as hay. Pond levels continued to drop. The condition of cattle continued to decline with the as pastures worsened. Cattle sales were up. Some infestation of red rice was reported in the rice crop.

    Southwest: Sporadic showers brought 1 inch to 2 inches of rain to some areas, but most of the region remained completely dry. High afternoon winds created dust storms. Record high or near-record high temperatures of over 100 degrees aggravated the drought. The region remains in wildfire-alert status. Many stock tanks were dry. Forage availability remained well below average for this time of the year. The cotton, watermelon and cantaloupe harvests were all ongoing. Some farmers planted sweet corn for an early fall harvest. Peanuts, pecans and landscape nursery crops continued to make good progress wherever irrigation water was still available. Ranchers were providing supplemental feed for livestock.

    West Central: Extremely hot, dry conditions continued. Wildfire dangers remained very high. Some areas reported scattered showers, but not enough moisture was received to make a difference. The heat has destroyed almost everything planted, including gardens. Rangeland and pastures were in poor condition. Trees in pastures were dying at an alarming rate. Stock-water tanks were very low or completely dry. Ranchers were hauling water to most livestock. Hay supplies were very limited. Producers continued to cull livestock herds. More and more livestock producers are selling out. 

    Photos courtesy of Texas AgriLife Extension Servive, Robert Burns.

    Top right: Desperate for hay, the owner of this baler and tractor was trying to harvest a parched field of grass on a neighbor’s property in East Texas. A spark from the baler ignited hay inside, and the resulting fire spread to more than 100 acres. No houses burned, but the operator lost both machines plus his pickup truck, which was parked nearby, according to witnesses.

    Middle left: Dr. Larry Redmon, Texas AgriLife Extension Service state forage specialist, during times of better grazing in East Texas.

    Bottom right: The 12 Texas AgriLife Extension Service Districts.

     

     

    Horse handling for new Horse Owners: A general blog from the Health Hoof

    Livestock Supplies

     

    A general guide for horse handling for new owners – a post from the Healthy Hoof blog.

     

    At Barn World, we offer a lot of great livestock products and everything from cattle guards, hay feeders, feed bins and saddle pads.  When discussing the large array of available products with customers, we sometimes lose sight of the fact that a lot of our customers are new to caring for and interacting with livestock, horses and poultry.  As such, I thought I’d include some general posts for those who are new to caring for and owning animals.

    If you’d like to share your ideas or comments please feel free and you may always contact Barn World at Sales@BarnWorld.com or call 720-238-2190.

     

     

    Recently I came across a good general information blog post from the Healthy Hoof.    It’s a general post, but provides a great initial outline and tips for interacting with your horse.

    Horse handling for new horse owners

    Even in today’s economy (or maybe because of it), new horse owners pop up every day. An inexperienced client will often purchase an inexperienced horse. It can be a challenge to teach both owner and horse techniques that ensure the safety and cooperation for everyone involved, but also very rewarding to be able to start with a “fresh” owner and essentially create the perfect client/professional relationship.

    Did you know that farriers interact with more horses than veterinarians, and even horse trainers? Due to the cyclical nature of hoof care, and horses’ impeccable memories, it is beneficial for me as a hoof care professional to form trusting relationships with my clients’ horses. Horses remember positive and negative experiences, and negative experiences can never be completely erased. This is one reason it is imperative that horse owners choose their hoof care professionals carefully.

    I’ve put together a list of basic horse handling techniques below, with a focus on holding a horse for a farrier or trimmer. Many of the techniques also apply to holding your horse for the veterinarian or other equine professionals. These techniques are based on logic, common sense, and my own experiences as a hoof care professional.

    It is my hope that these tips will help prevent some foreseeable accidents and possibly save some lives.

    Use appropriate and properly fitted tack.
    I prefer a rope halter with at least a 12 foot lead. A longer lead may be necessary for a young or green horse, because it can be used to move the horse around should groundwork training come into play. A rope halter is gentle, but uncomfortable if a horse leans into it, unlike standard wide nylon or leather halters. Rope halters are especially effective when working with pushy horses.

    Ask your horse to focus on the task at hand.
    Encourage him to relax by petting him softly (but not with a brush in the middle of shedding season!). Do not distract your horse with treats or hay, because he may forget that someone is handling his hooves. Feeding horses also causes body weight to shift a lot (especially if they are reaching for a treat), which makes it difficult for your farrier to balance under him. Treats are okay as rewards for good behavior, but the timing must be right.

    If a horse misbehaves, correct it, but give warning to your farrier beforehand.
    One of the most effective maneuvers for correcting a horse is backing him up – with energy. This does not mean pushing him back with all of your strength, but asking/insisting that the horse back up with your body language. Pushy, dominant, or spoiled horses can be taken down a notch or two by using this technique. It also redirects the horse’s focus back to you and your farrier.

    When working on front feet, stand on the opposite side of the horse’s head, facing your farrier and horse at a 45-degree angle.
    If you stand facing your horse, your farrier may have difficulty maneuvering around you, or you could be struck by an overly exuberant horse. Stand in a position where you are able to observe your horse’s body language and warn your farrier of behavior that may indicate a dangerous situation. Be aware of the surroundings, and keep children and pets away from the work area.

    When working on hind feet, stand on the same side of the horse as your farrier.
    Keep the horse’s head slightly tilted towards you so that he can see you and your farrier easily. Keep your horse from turning his head the opposite direction as this will shift his weight onto the hind foot that is off the ground. Your farrier’s back will thank you for this!

    When walking or trotting out your horse for gait analysis, keep your horse on a loose lead.
    Avoid pulling on your horse’s head as it affects his weight distribution and gait. Give your horse at least 3 feet of lead rope. Teach your horse to trot with you as the trot is a common gait used for identifying lameness and gait abnormalities. A flat, smooth surface where the horse can be walked or trotted in a straight line or circle is desirable in these situations.

    I hope this information will prove beneficial for horse owners and equine health professionals. Please feel free to post additional tips as comments, and share/print this article as long as it is credited/linked back to this site.

    Livestock scale: The best all around weigh bar scale is a great portable animal scale too!

     

     

    Weigh bars from Barn World:  The best cattle scales in the business

     

    A large variety of livestock scales are displayed at Barn World and the most popular animal scale is certainly the weigh bars.  They make an excellent cattle scale and are the best chute scales available.

    The MTI-500 bars are made of carbon steel and covered with a high-grade epoxy.  Also of tough construction is the digital weigh indicator made with stainless steel for the best durability and toughness available.

    This livestock scale features two loaded cells in each bar.  Each bar rests on two feet with a 3″ height capacity to assist in leveling.  The load cell has a 3m v/v output and a 2x protection for overloads.  Extra durable, the scale operates in temperatures as low as 14 degrees to over 100 degrees Fahrenheit.

    Weigh bars


    It comes in two sizes: 33″ and a 40″ length, a 25ft home run cable for the ability to place the digital indicator where it’s most convenient and accessible.     There are also optional platforms available made from high strength aluminum.

    Visit Barn World today at www.BarnWorld.com for all of your livestock scales and livestock equipment needs.