Hay feeders from Barn World Livestock Supplies

Although the grass is starting to grow and hay becomes more plentiful, it’s still important to contain your feed costs with a hay feeder from Barn World Livestock Supplies.  Wasted hay is a common problem that can increase feed expense as wasted hay is money down the drain.  Selecting the proper equine or livestock hay feeder for your animals is not only a simple and effective way to keep costs low and profits up, but it will also save you time refilling and cleaning up the blown-around trampled hay.  Make sure you get one before the price of feeding sneaks up on you in the summer months.

Selecting the right hay feeder

There are many different styles of hay feeders for every budget and all will produce large savings that will allow them to pay for themselves in short order.  Designed for everything from large round hay bales, square bales and even as small as feeding individual flakes, there’s a feeder that will minimize waste and provide years of higher profits.  Selecting the right one for your animals is quick and easy.

Hay feeders Styles

Rack and Trough Feeders

Combo, or rack and trough feeders are very popular as they serve a double duty:  They suspend the hay for consumption over a trough which can be used to feed supplements and also catch loose hay before it hits the ground.  Your animals will easily pull the scraps out of the feed trough and not waste fallen hay.

Combo hay feeders are designed for goats, sheep, horses and cattle by varying the height of the trough.  The most common heights are:

  • Sheep – trough height 20″
  • Horse – trough height 30″ and 36″
  • Cattle – trough height 23-1/2″

Their versatility allows them to feed both hay and/or grain & minerals when necessary, which is a very convenient feature when supplementing diets and they are available for both round bales and square.

Hay feeder for cattle  Horse Hay Feeder

One of the most popular and indestructible of the cattle hay / grain feeders is this large 600 pound, skid-mounted bale feeder:

Made from a very heavy 2″ x 2″ square 16 gauge tubing, this almost eight foot square feeder stands 72″ tall and is one of the toughest out there.  It can accommodate both square and round bales and has an 18 gauge steel pan with rolled edges to avoid any cuts on your cattle.  The center is composed of outward angling tubing to keep the hay on the outside where your cattle can reach it.  To ensure longevity and make it the toughest around, it is an entirely welded design that contains not nuts and bolts, eliminating wobble and torquing.  It’s one solid piece designed to last a lifetime!

Below is a quick video tour of this indestructible hay feeder from Sioux Steel:

Hay hopper round bale feeders

Along the same design as the combo feeders, the Hay Hopper Round Bale Feeders suspend the hay with chains and come with or without a skirt at the bottom.

suspended hay feeder

The skirted hay hopper feeder does will with buffalo and cattle too.  It has a large 7′ 6″ inside diameter and is made with 14 gauge, 1-1/4″  square tubing. Built for round bales, it stands 68 inches tall and has 16 feeding stations – a lot of cattle can eat at once!  It’s unique chain design allows a large bale to be dropped in from the top for livestock to access below. The steel skirt keeps the wind from blowing around the straw and presents it for easy consumption.  This particular feeder is powder coated and all tubes are either capped sealed to keep water out.  Its bolt together, two-piece design allows this feeder to be easily ship economically throughout the United States.

Round bale feeders

The traditional round bale feeder is made from a steel skirt with a large diameter to accommodate field bales and will have stanchions to separate animals during feeding time.  Built to be extremely tough and left out in the elements, these heavy-duty feeders coming in all types of shapes and sizes.  The most popular design is of course is round, and usually in an 8 to 9 foot diameter for your largest bales.

Below is an example of a round bale feeder with a closed bottom and mud legs to keep the skirt from resting directly on the ground.

round bale feeder  horse hay feeder

These feeders are powder coated to protect them from rust and are designed to give years of feed savings.

Another very tough round bale feeder is the Bull Tuff feeder.
The bull tuff round bale feeder is very large and extremely robust with twelve openings and nine mud legs to keep it entirely off the ground. The three-piece design allows it to be shipped very economically.

livestock hay feeder

Plastic Horse Hay Feeder

Our most popular for horses is poly round horse hay feeder from Sioux Steel.  Designed from the beginning specifically for horses, all of the joints are overlapping to eliminate any kind of sharp edge and all bolts our countersunk into the walls to prevent any cuts or scrapes to equine legs.

horse hay feeder  

Extremely easy to maneuver at only 80 pounds, it can be rolled into position and dropped over the round bale quite easily.  Once in place, the legs also have the ability to be staked down in high wind areas if necessary.  The thoughtful 4-piece design allows it to be shipping in four pieces, keeping shipping costs low and economical to send to send to any of the lower 48 states.

To keep profits up, you’ll need to keep expenses down and a simple and efficient hay feeder is the best way to make sure you realize both goals.  Don’t wait until prices skyrocket this summer to invest inequality hay feeder from BarnWorld.com

Hay Feeder Review – control your costs – Barn World Livestock Supplies

 

Hay feeders

Hay feeders can make or break your livestock profit margins in a hurry. Wasted hay is one of the most expensive, yet easily containable costs associated with raising animals.  With such an impact on your bottom line, it’s extremely important to minimize your feed expenses and Barn World has the hay feeders to do just that.

The most effective means of keeping your livestock from wasting hay and driving up your feeding costs is to contain the hay in a clean environment that gives them the opportunity to eat it rather than walk on it.  We’ve all experienced hay blowing around a feeder only to be trampled into the mud by the animals that should be eating it, creating a needless waste of money. The simple solution is a hay feeder that not only allows them to eat from the bale, but also keeps the hay clean and together for consumption.

Here’s a look at three different styles of hay feeders that offer long lasting economic benefits for feeding your livestock:

Bull Tuff Round Bale Feeder

 This feeder is a large, traditional round bale feeder with a 9 foot diameter and 12 feed openings. It has heavy-duty mud legs, and its 1-1/2″ x 2.5″ 16 gauge high tensile tubing makes this feeder extremely sturdy to take years of abuse from your livestock.  Weighing in at 440 pounds, this large feeder will handle up to 20 head of cattle.

Hay/Grain Feeder

This is an extremely large and heavy cattle feeder weighing 600 pounds.  It rests on skids so that it may be moved about your pastures with ease. At 7 feet wide, 8 feet long and 72 inches tall, this indestructible feeder offers the ability to suspend your hay bale above the mud, dirt and water and can also be used to feed grain in the pan below.  The entirely welded design of 2″ square tubing and angle iron give it incredible strength to withstand any abuse.

Hay Hopper Feeder

A unique design in that it suspends the hay bale off the ground and allows your livestock to get out it from all angles. Suspending the hay bale helps prevent water damage, rotting and mold.  It also keeps the bale fresh and free from dirt so the hay remains a clean source of food for your livestock.  It’s a simple and effective means of keeping hay costs to a minimum.

Keeping your costs low and your animals healthy and growing are the primary objective of any rancher.  These hay feeders are designed to last and provide economic benefits to you and your livestock for years.

Hay Feeders Save Money and Pay for Themselves Quickly

Barn World Logo

Hay Feeders Save Money and Pay for Themselves Quickly

It’s another hot and dry summer and the cost of feeding your livestock is only going up as hay gets more difficult to come by.   Shipping hay long distances from the few growing areas left in the country to the animals that need it has become all too common.

To make the best of this terrible hay growing season and to save as much money as you can while still providing for your animals, it’s important to provide the most efficient means of feeding and minimize the amount of waste produced.  This calls for a no-nonsense hay feeder from Barn World.

There are many different feeder styles that allow for any budget and will produce savings that will allow the feeder to pay for itself in a short amount of time.  Whether you feed small square bales to a few animals, or large round bales to a lot, the proper feeder is critical to saving money.  A quality feeder will allow you to minimize money lost to hay waste that falls on the ground and erodes your profits, while providing a safe environment to maximize your feeding budget.

Types of Hay Feeders

Round Bale Feeders

For large animals that are fed large quantities at a time, you can’t go wrong with a round bale feeder.  These large and durable feeders are designed to feed almost any large animal from cattle to buffalo.  We carry a Bull Tuff Round Bale Feeder that has a 9’ 6” bottom diameter that tapers to 8’6” at the top.  It will accommodate the 6’ round bale, has 12 feed openings and 9 heavy duty  mud skids to keep the feeder entirely off the ground.  There are no sharp edges for animals to cut themselves and the 3 piece bolted assembly is built for years of heavy duty use.  This is a very common and popular feeder for large bulls and horses.

Another large animal feeder that’s new and very popular is the hay hopper design.  This feeder holds the bale off of the ground and livestock will eat from the bottom up.  The loose hay will drop to the bottom of the feeder where it is protected from being trampled by a metal skirt.  This preserves the hay to be eating directly under the suspended bale.  The hay hopper feeders are made for cattle, buffalo, horses, goats and sheep and has a patent pending design.

Horse Hay Feeders

For a quick and simple method of feeding your horses’ large bales, look no further then the Hay Hut Hay Feeder.  At 84” deep and 72” wide, and a height of 84”, this plastic feeder will not rust out and is extremely easy to use.  Simply drop your bale on the ground and cover with the hay hut.  It’s an attractive feeder that looks like a small house or hut and has eight feeding stations available for easy access to the hay bale.  It also provides a covered shelter to protect the bale from the weather and the sun.  This feeder ships in two easy to assemble sections and will fit in the back of a pickup truck.  It takes approximately half an hour to put together and is easy to move around your pasture should you choose.

The plastic is a durable and UV protected material that provides fantastic, maintenance free cover for your bales.  There is a one year warranty and most feeders last for 10 or more years with steady use.  They’re also available in two colors:  black and forest green.

Popular Horse Hay Feeders

One of the most popular horse hay feeders is the Poly Round Hose Hay Feeder.    It’s designed especially for horses and all of the hardware is counter-sunk into the feeder so there aren’t any sharp edges for potential cuts or scrapes.  This feeder is mad e from four pieces to form the circle and is also idea for small ponies and colts.  It’s easy to assemble and move to where you’d like to feed.  Simply drop your round bale either on the ground or on a pallet, roll the feeder next to it and drop it over the bale.  At only 80lbs, this one is extremely portable and can be rolled to your bale.  Made from recycled plastic, it’s environmentally friendly and is composed of UV resistant resin.  With a two year warranty on material and workmanship,  this feed will last for many seasons.

Rack and Trough Hay Feeders – the combo feeder

Rack and Trough Feeders allow for both hay bales and grain to be feed from the same feeder.  Another plus is the ability of the trough below the rack to catch hay that falls when animals pull from the bale.  This allows the hay to be eaten from the trough, rather than wasted on the ground and eating into your profits.

Our combo feeders come in a variety of sizes, each designed for the animal being fed.  They are primarily built to accommodate cattle or horses and the versatility of the feeder allows for animals that require both grain and hay in their diet.  A very convenient feature.

Portable and Stall Feeders

Although used in the stall with smaller amounts of hay, a lot of potential food can still be wasted.  The portable hay feeders are useful when traveling or in the stall.  Typically mounted on the wall or in a corner, they can provide an easy means of dumping in flakes for your animal to enjoy at any time.  The Health-EZ Hay Feeder even does double duty as ‘entertainment’ and can keep some horses minds occupied and out of trouble while they nudge a hanging feeder around the stall.

It doesn’t matter what type of animals you’re raising or enjoying, a hay feeder is one of the easiest ways to introduce an efficient means of saving money and will pay for themselves in short order.

Visit Barn World today to view all of our livestock supplies and if there’s anything we can help with, please let us know by calling (720) 238-2190.

Horse hay feeder from Hay Hut – A great horse round bale feeder!

Barn WorldBarn World now carries the Hay Hut hay feeder!

 As the entire country is affected by the drought, the cost of feeding your livestock continues to rise.  It’s now more important then ever to minimize waste from feeding.

Barn World carries a large selection of hay feeders to minimize waste and provide increase profits.  The Hay Hut hay feeder is a great horse hay feeder that is so easy to use and simple in design that feeding round bales to your animals is a cinch.

Horse Hay Feeder

In addition to the actual hay/cost savings, the use of large bale hay significantly reduces Labor costs and these Hayhuts help to minimise pasture stress in overstock situations and during poor forage growing conditions.

It is interesting to note how well these units stop ‘big bale bickering’ and also how they bring a strong air of calmness and contentedness across the ranch as the horses all know that they have a constant source of forage.

The unit ships in two halves with simple build instructions and takes approximately 30 minutes to bolt together. They are very easy to move, manage, load and maintain

The Hayhut is a robust, durable, and UV stabilized covered hay feeder made of polyethylene and hence it cannot rust and does not require any maintenance unlike the majority of metal feeders.

 

The Hayhut is a full 84 inches in depth so that it can accommodate the largest of round rolls now being produced in the USA and up to twenty conventional square bales or the majority of big square bales. This additional depth also allows it to be easily pushed back over very large bales, even if they have been placed on a pallet, without catching the top lip of the feeder on the bale.

It is 84 inches high so that there is plenty of headroom for the use of a pallet while still allowing for good airflow and cooling over the top of the bale.

Hayhut will fit in the back of pickup. The width of 72 inches allows up to three units (in six halves) to be transported easily in a standard bed pick-up truck (see photo).

The Hayhut is delivered in halves to reduce shipping costs and a single half unit can be ordered. A half unit can be mounted against a wall or hard structure for use with conventional square bales. It can also be mounted against a fence with a locally purchased plywood back attached for weather protection

This half unit measures 42″ x 72″ x 84″ and has four feeding windows.

The unit ships in two halves with simple build instructions and takes approximately 30 minutes to bolt together. They are very easy to move, manage, load and maintain and we have many testimonials to that effect. The Hayhut is supplied with all assembly hardware and a lifting eye for relocation purposes. It can also be relocated with a round roll by inserting the roll inside the unit. Just see our video to see how easy it is to move.

Hayhuts are warranted for 1 year. Similar units of identical material from the same manufacturer have been examined after 6 years of 24/7 use in Missouri and this leads us to believe that Hayhuts should provide at least 10 years of good service which is an outstanding return on investment.They are designed and manufactured to accommodate all sizes of round rolls up to 1600 lbs. We have incorporated bigger windows for larger horses up to 17hh and anchor points for windy conditions.

Here’s a great demonstration video:

http://youtu.be/G8rjnBk1wh4

Below are just some of the happy customers we have using Hayhuts. 
Please contact us for more information or if you wish to provide a testimonial about how Hayhut hay feeders work for you.

Gottado Ranch, Ocala – April 2011
We purchased 2 Hay Huts at an equine event in Ocala, FL. They are easy to set up and use. As soon as we had them in the field the horses came over to check it out. They were eating out of it before we left. We had a really bad rainstorm about 3 days after we started using our Hay Huts. I went out after the storm to check the hay inside the huts. The hay was bone dry! The wind did not even blow rain in the windows. The horses love it and none of them fight. There is no manure or urine in the hay because the Hay Hut prevents this. This results in almost all of the hay in the Hay Hut is being used as food rather than bedding. Thank you Hay Hut for a great product that saves time and money. We plan on purchasing another Hay Hut before next winter.

January 2011
Thank you so much
for your courtesy and help as I decided whether or not to buy your Hayhuts product, for Potomac Glen Riding School . Since we have four paddocks at Potomac Glen, each containing 5 to 7 horses, we needed at least four Hayhuts, and I was initially very concerned about what I thought might be an expensive investment.

I am very pleased 
to report that the four Hayhuts I purchased have exceeded my wildest hopes of better hay usage & economy. Without a doubt, the Hayhuts have halved my round bale usage in just the last few months, thereby cutting my hay costs substantially. The Hayhuts have eliminated hay waste by keeping the horses from sleeping & defecating on the round bale hay. They also keep the ice, snow and rain off the round bales so I no longer lose a lot of hay. The Hayhuts have also eliminated the typical wasted mound of unusable hay, and the horses eat all of the round bale hay and leave only dust. My quality if life has improved because, in addition to saving on my round bale hay costs, I have also cut my work load substantially by feeding the bales to my horses only once a week, instead of two times a week, and the paddock clean up is virtually non-existent! Thank you again for your Hayhuts. When finances permit, I will be adding two more Hayhuts to the riding school. I will be happy to talk to anyone who is interested in Hayhuts. They can contact me at (301)601-0622, or our website is www.potomacglenridingschool.com. I will be happy to tell them about my experiences and to heartily recommend Hayhuts!
Susan Hansen Potomac Glen Riding School 24201 Clarksburg Road Clarksburg , MD 20871 2.

January 2011
Eliminates almost all waste!
Just a note to tell you I don’t think you were totally truthful with me when we talked about the hay hut: you said I could probably reduce hay waste by about 30%… well I have now fed two round bales out of the hut and am COMPLETELY CONVINCED waste is almost totally non existent! I watch the horses eat every day at some time or other and it seems when they do drag a mouthful out of the hut and drop it, that before they stick their heads back in they almost always pick up what they have dropped and eat it first. If there is a mouthful laying on the ground when they first walk up to the hut they usually pick it up and eat it first! They have developed really good “table” manners. I would bet out of the two bales fed so far, not even three (YES 3!) pounds of hay has been wasted and when it has snowed it was totally protected. The price initially, did seem high but with the price of hay it will pay for itself in very short order, well worth the investment for sure! Thanks for delivering and helping me get started assembling it and Thanks for a GREAT product!

AUGUST 21st 2010
The Hay Hut is really working out well!
The horses love it. Little to no waste on the hay. The hay stays dry, and no fussing. We did learn to set the hay on end instead of the side, as on the side they were able to peal layers off and out. Not so when it’s sitting on end. Carole (Missouri)

MAY 1st 2010
I just wanted to tell you that I put up 2 huts in my fields for my 5 horses and the 2 round bales lasted 3 weeks! I was feeding 4 bales of hay/day and at $4-$5/bale/day, that was about $16-$20/day. With the Hayhuts I am only spending about $4/day! I love them! Thanks, Kelly Melberg Winlock, Wa

A letter from Pennsylvania

We wanted to drop you a note and let you know how satisfied we are with your product. We purchased three units from you in July ’09. The units were assembled and put in the pastures once we received them. We started feeding hay on and off from October until December. Starting in December we began feeding fulltime from the feeders.

Our hay usage has shown a dramatic decrease. We do not see the large hay/manure piles that we routinely had using conventional round bale feeders. By this time each winter I am usually looking for sources of hay; our barn still has enough to last us for another two months. We have the largest number of horses that we ever have had on the farm, we have used less hay than we used to with fewer animals. We have fed small square bales, large round bales and large square bales in the feeders: they handle all of these varieties without any problems at all.

We are feeding animals in a variety of sizes and breeds. They all readily use the feeders without any problems. We are feeding our foals, yearlings, broodmares, miniature donkeys and a large Thoroughbred and Irish Sport horse on these feeders. We have three pastures running at the present time, one feeder has five horses on it, one has ten broodmares and the other has six geldings and two donkeys.

Assembly of the units was easy and took only around 20 minutes per hut. The green color blends in well with our fields and makes the huts easy to find in snow drifts, lol. Ordering and delivery were easy and I believe we will easily recover the cost of the units by the end of this year or the beginning of next. The amount of hay saved and a decrease in wasted hay/manure mixed is unbelievable.

We would highly recommend your product to anyone feeding horses round bales of hay or even small bales. The quality of the huts, the cost, the performance and your customer service have made purchasing and using these units a pleasure.

Thank you, The Hillards Pat and Kathy Hillard

City of Houston Mounted Patrol
Hayhuts are everything they say they are and more. We’ve had 4 Hayhuts for over 5 months now and have already recognized a savings with less waste. All 38 Police Horses love the Hayhuts as there is always fresh clean hay available to them when they are turned out. There is no fighting over the hay and no injuries caused by the Hayhuts. We have all sizes and breeds of horses at the Houston Mounted Patrol and all of them love the Hayhuts. Hayhuts prove the simplest designs are usually the best. Our horses thank you for making such a great product!” – Sgt. Leslie Wills, Houston Mounted Patrol

Road to the Horse Chris Cox uses Hayhut Hayhuts save and preserve the hay. They keep the hay weather protected and are horse friendly.” – Chris Cox

Nebraska Blizzard
Hay Feeders for Horses
Hi Denis, Just thought I’d let you know the Hayhuts made it through their first Nebraska blizzard just fine! I thought I may find them either full of snow or blown across my feeding area, but, neither was the case. They stayed in place, no snow was inside and the horses had plenty to eat all through the storm! – Mary Anne G. – Nebraska From using one round bale every 3-3 1/2 days to every 5-5 1/2 days I have been using the amazing Hayhuts for not quite a year now. I was about done with round bales before I found these. The horses would waste so much. We had one paddock where we were feeding 1 round bale every 3 to 3 1/2 days. When we started using the Hayhut it went to 5, 5 1/2 days sometimes even 6 days. I am now using 1/2 a Hayhut in a shed and another on the fence line. We throw small square bales or flakes of hay. There is no waste doing that. When you feed alfalfa to the babies they do not stand on it any more. They love their hay hut. If you ever use one you will not let it go. What a great invention.
– Karen Bruce, Irish Oaks Farm

The mini can eat there too
“Well it’s been a week and I LOVE it. Loads of rain and all the hay dry. The mini can eat there too, if I put hay high or just put bale under opening. Another satisfied customer. Thanks!” – Vicki – Florida

 

Be sure to feed smart this summer and receive the economical benefits and ease of use the Horse Hut Hay Feeder offers.

Also visit Barn World today for all of your livestock supplies needs.  We also carry a large selection of cattle guards, hay feeders, grain bins and even 5 Star saddle pads.

Hay Feeders – Texas drought makes hay feeders ever so important

 

The extreme Texas drought has made hay feeders even more important than ever.  Given the extreme conditions and the lack of natural hay and even the lack of hay from neighboring states available to be trucked in, it has become a necessity to have hay feeders that eliminate any kind of waste.

 

Barn World has a large selection of hay feeders that minimize waste and maximize the amount of hay that gets to your herd.  Please view our large hay feeder selection online to minimize the cost of feed and help eliminate any possibility of  selling out any livestock.

 

We have a great selection of combo hay feeders, standard bale feeders, portable hay feeders and stall feeders.  In fact, visit BarnWorld for all of your livestock equipment and livestock supply needs.

 

Below is a succinct  article from Progressive Cattleman detailing the severity of the drought Texas is dealing with.  We hope that it ends soon and the herds get back to normal quickly.

 

 

Texas crop, weather: It’s a ‘no-brainer;’ sell out herds now PDF Print E-mail

Tuesday, 16 August 2011 14:10
Written by Tony Okon – Progressive Cattleman

 

COLEGE STATION – With little to no grazing and hay, should livestock producers continue to try to buy feed, move cattle to another state or just sell out?

 

“It would be much less expensive to just get out and come back later,” said Dr. Larry Redmon, Texas AgriLife Extension Service state forage specialist. “And that’s the message that we’re trying to convey.”

Many livestock producers have already tried to cut feeding costs by extensively culling their herds, but have held onto enough cows to rebuild their herds if the drought passes, he said.

In some dry years, that might be a good strategy, but not this one, Redmon said.

“It’s unprecedented,” he said. “(We’ve had) the 12 driest months in Texas history, and there’s just not many ways to combat that.”

With grazing and hay supplies next to non-existent in many areas of the state, it’s getting very expensive to buy feed. On average, it’s costing producers “somewhere around a $100 a month to have these animals (cows) stay in the pasture and feed them,” he said.

Another choice is to move cattle elsewhere, most likely another state during this drought, and lease land where there is grazing, Redmon said.

“It could be western Mississippi; it could be eastern Louisiana; or it could be maybe Missouri,” he said. ‘I haven’t talked to anybody this year, but in the past couple of years people have called me from other states and they’ve quoted prices of $20 to $22 per (cow/calf) pair per month. Even assuming that’s $25 or $30 that’s still a far, far cry from $100 a month.”

Of course, one has to add the cost of hauling a trailer load of cattle to the leased grazing, but even with that added cost it still cheaper than trying to buy hay and feed at today’s prices, he said.

“It’s probably going to be $3 to $3.50 a loaded mile –something like that,” he said. “If you just put all that together … the savings could still be tremendous if a person could find a place to put those animals.”

But completely selling out makes more sense yet, Redmon said, given there’s no guarantee this drought will end anytime soon.

“Some people would counter and say it’ll cost more to come back into the business later because conditions will have improved, and more people will be getting back in,” he said. “That’s true. But again, looking at the difference in what it would cost to buy cows and come back in at some later date — versus what they would spend trying to go through this drought — mathematically, it’s just a no-brainer.”

More information on the current Texas drought and wildfire alerts can be found on the AgriLife Extension Agricultural Drought Task Force website athttp://agrilife.tamu.edu/drought/.

AgriLife Extension district reporters compiled the following summaries:

Central: Northern parts of the district received from 2 to 5 inches of rain, but conditions remained largely unchanged. Sale barns were full each Saturday. Cattle were getting thin. All livestock producers were heavily feeding. Hay and water was in short supply. Farmers continued to harvest crops worth harvesting. Many crops were being zeroed-out for insurance purposes.

Coastal Bend: Though light showers were reported in some areas, extreme drought conditions persisted. The cotton harvest was ongoing. Livestock producers continued to sell off herds due to lack of forage. Most watering ponds were dry. Some water wells were also going dry, and some producers were drilling new ones. Many trees were dying or showing signs of drought stress.

East: No rain was received, and the drought worsened. Water levels in stock ponds and creeks were dangerously low. Many trees were dying or going dormant early. Hay was no longer being harvested. Producers were searching for hay to buy. Out-of-state purchases were becoming more common. Ranchers continued culling and selling off herds. Livestock began to show signs of obvious weight-loss.

North: Soil moisture was very short over most of the area. Daytime highs of 100-plus degrees and nighttime lows in the mid-80s continued to be the norm. A few areas received some rain, which might improve pastures if they are not overgrazed and given time to regrow. Without rain, most pastures continued to go downhill. The corn and grain sorghum harvests were nearly complete with yields reported to be slightly above average. Soybeans – those that survived the drought — were also being harvested. Some soybeans were cut for hay and the rest were being plowed under. Corn and milo stalks were being harvested as hay and shipped all over the state. Where there was hay, it was being sold before it was cut. Once baled, hay was being loaded on trucks and shipped out before the baler got cold. Most livestock producers were feeding hay and supplements to cattle. With heavy supplemental feeding and short hay supplies, producers continued to cull their herds and were scrambling to find hay for immediate feeding and for winter. Some livestock producers were selling out. Water was becoming a major concern as ponds were getting very low. Hay producers hoped for late August or September rains so they could possibly produce one more cutting. Trees were dying from the record heat and lack of rain for over 60 days in most areas. Rangeland and pasture conditions were very poor.

Panhandle: Most of the region received scattered showers and cooler weather. Accumulations ranged from a trace to 1.5 inches. The rain and cooler weather was welcomed, but it was not enough moisture to help the very thirsty crops. Soil moisture levels remained very short. Irrigators were watering full swing trying to keep up with water demands. Gray County received hail along with the rain, which stripped the leaves off some cotton and corn. Also, high winds toppled six pivots in that county. The rain greened up some pastures, but more was needed to really make a difference in the very poor conditions. However, the cooler weather did ease water needs and heat stress on cattle. Supplemental feeding of livestock continued. Producers who were trying to hang on to their cattle were buying hay form other states, with hauling costs running $20-$30 per ton.

Rolling Plains: Rain! But the amount varied greatly from county to county. Throckmorton County received from 0.5 inch to 3 inches of rain, while Stephens County received from 0.5 inch to 5 inches. Haskell County received as much as 2.8 inches. Other counties received from 0.1 to 0.8 inch. However, the majority of counties did not receive any measurable moisture. The rain was no help for cotton producers, though it did help wheat growers who would like to plant in September. More moderate temperatures, especially nighttime lows, helped relieve stress on livestock. Cotton was fruiting, but even under heavy watering, fields still looked weak. Producers were weaning and selling calves. Some producers are selling or shipping their cows to out-of-state grazing. Hay was scarce and expensive when available. A few hay producers hoped to have a late-summer cutting. Large trees were beginning to show the effects of too little moisture.

South: Record-high temperatures continued. In Webb County, temperatures of 104 and higher were reported. Some daytime highs reached 108 or even 110 degrees. Rangeland and pastures further declined, forage supplies and stock-tank water levels dropped. Many livestock water tanks had already completely dried out. In Live Oak County, there were record numbers of livestock sales at sale barns. The heaviest livestock culling was taking place in Webb and Zavala counties, where ranchers have completely run out of water resources. Also, feed sources in those counties were very scarce. The western portion of Frio County received 0.5 to 1 inch of rain. Also in that Frio County, the corn harvest was completed, the cotton harvest began and the sorghum harvest was ongoing. Most crops in Jim Wells County were harvested, and fields were ready for fall and winter preparations. In Zavala County, farmers were preparing land for cabbage and spinach planting, and pecan producers were irrigating orchards in the critical kernel-development stage. In Hidalgo County, the cotton harvesting was winding down. In Starr County, farmers were planting sugarcane and fall vegetables. In Willacy County, harvesting of late-planted cotton continued.

South Plains: Some areas received as much as 3 inches of rain. Others got none. The remaining cotton is from two weeks to a month ahead of schedule; and the final stages of flowering or in cut-out. In other areas, cotton was shedding bolls and squares from lack of water. Of the 42,000 cotton acres planted in Garza County, only 8,000 remained. Many producers were planning on an early harvest. High temperatures dropped into the 90s. Most counties were still under burn bans. Some growers chose to dig and harvest peanut vines for hay due to the low pegging rate. White grapes in Yoakum County were harvested, and red grapes were expected to be ready by the end of August. Cattle producers were selling off herds because of shortages of grass, hay and water.

Southeast: The extreme drought did not budge. The month of July closed with a nearly 22-inch rainfall deficit for the year in some parts of the region. Some areas had scattered showers. Grain sorghum and rice fields were being baled and sold for livestock forage. Early July had brought some light rains that allowed for re-growth of grain sorghum. But tests showed very high prussic acid levels. People feeding this forage to livestock were cautioned to test all sorghum grass species before grazing or feeding as hay. Pond levels continued to drop. The condition of cattle continued to decline with the as pastures worsened. Cattle sales were up. Some infestation of red rice was reported in the rice crop.

Southwest: Sporadic showers brought 1 inch to 2 inches of rain to some areas, but most of the region remained completely dry. High afternoon winds created dust storms. Record high or near-record high temperatures of over 100 degrees aggravated the drought. The region remains in wildfire-alert status. Many stock tanks were dry. Forage availability remained well below average for this time of the year. The cotton, watermelon and cantaloupe harvests were all ongoing. Some farmers planted sweet corn for an early fall harvest. Peanuts, pecans and landscape nursery crops continued to make good progress wherever irrigation water was still available. Ranchers were providing supplemental feed for livestock.

West Central: Extremely hot, dry conditions continued. Wildfire dangers remained very high. Some areas reported scattered showers, but not enough moisture was received to make a difference. The heat has destroyed almost everything planted, including gardens. Rangeland and pastures were in poor condition. Trees in pastures were dying at an alarming rate. Stock-water tanks were very low or completely dry. Ranchers were hauling water to most livestock. Hay supplies were very limited. Producers continued to cull livestock herds. More and more livestock producers are selling out. 

Photos courtesy of Texas AgriLife Extension Servive, Robert Burns.

Top right: Desperate for hay, the owner of this baler and tractor was trying to harvest a parched field of grass on a neighbor’s property in East Texas. A spark from the baler ignited hay inside, and the resulting fire spread to more than 100 acres. No houses burned, but the operator lost both machines plus his pickup truck, which was parked nearby, according to witnesses.

Middle left: Dr. Larry Redmon, Texas AgriLife Extension Service state forage specialist, during times of better grazing in East Texas.

Bottom right: The 12 Texas AgriLife Extension Service Districts.

 

 

Hay Feeder Post from Barn World: The Bull Tuff Hay Feeder – the toughest of the hay feeders

 

BarnWorld.com

Hay Feeder Post from Barn World

 

Barn World has a large selection of hay feeders ad one of the toughest hay feeders on the market is the Bull Tuff  hay feeder.  it’s built to accommodate large livestock and can handle any abuse with its strong design and 16gauge steel workmanship.  This hay feeder is built to last and is virtually indestructible.

Below is a short video of the Bull Tuff hay feeder from Sioux Steel:

Video Text:

This is the Sioux Steel BullTuff hay feeder.  It comes in three easy to assemble joints, bolted together.  It’s 9.8 foot round at the bottom and it’s 8 foot around the top and allows you to accommodate any size bail that you’re going to put in here.  It’s made of 16gauge steel, all rounded corners.  You’re going to be able to feed bulls, buffalo, horses and anything that you have, this thing is going to handle.  It’s made in the high country Brown and it’s going to take anything that your stock can put to it.

Some of the great features of this hay feeder include:

  • 9`6 bottom diameter tapers to 8`6 at the top
  • Tapered top limits feed waste, but accepts 6 foot large bales
  • 3 piece bolted assembly
  • 12 feed openings
  • 9 heavy-duty mud legs keep feeder off the ground
  • Designed to take years of tough use
  • No sharp edges protects necks and manes
  • Feeds 20 head
  • Saves 6%-8% of you hay bale
  •  

    Visit Barn World today for all of your hay feeder and livestock supply needs, or call 720-238-2190.

    Hay feeders: now is the time to invest in a quality hay feeder, hay prices due to rise

     

     

    Hay prices are due to rise and now’s the time to get a quality hay feeder to minimize waste.  With prices expected to climb as the year goes on, it’s more important than ever to eliminate wasted hay and not throw money away when feeding your livestock.

    Barn World has a large selection of hay feeders.  From new designs that literally eliminate waste like the round bale feeder hay hopper for cattle and the round bale feeder hay hopper for sheep and goats.

    For cattle

    For sheep and goats

     

    Their designs allow the hay be suspended above the ground and contain any falling hay so it may be accessed by your livestock without being trampled and wasted.  These feeders will literally pay for themselves in a short amount of time.

    Barn World also carries a wide selection of traditional round bale feeders.  Closed bottom hay feeders offer a simple and economical way to keep the hay from blowing around and from being pawed at and turned into wasted hay/money.  We also have the Bull Tuff hay feeder designed to take any abuse livestock can throw at it.  It’s one of the heaviest duty hay feeders on the market and is designed for maximum durability.

    Bull Tuff Feeder

    For horses, please check out the poly horse hay feeders designed especially for equine.  All hardware is counter sunk so nothing is exposed, providing protection and safety for your horse.  These feeders are lightweight and made of durable yet extremely strong plastic and are easy to manage.  The round bale feeder is 7 ‘ in diameter and the square panel feeder can be made into almost any size desired.

    For longhorn cattle, we offer the modified round bale feeder with metal plates welded to the uprights to prevent horn-hook.

    All of these feeders are designed to prevent wasted money through wasted hay when feeding your livestock.  Nothing is more disheartening then seeing your hay scattered around the pastor being walked on instead of eaten.  With the price of hay continually rising it is important to contain your costs with a hay feeder from Barn World.

    Please see our full selection at www.BarnWorld.com and view all of our products from cattle guards to saddle pads.

    Here’s an article from The Northwest Farm Credit Services newsletter, July 2011 detailing the outlook for the cost of hay for the remainder of the year.  Between a limited supply in an increase in demand, costs are expected to rise.

    Hay supplies tight in the Pacific Northwest PDF Print E-mail
    Wednesday, 13 July 2011 10:52
    ShareThis
    Hay supplies in the Pacific Northwest are tight. The 2011 season began with very little carryover hay available, and the cool, wet spring significantly delayed first cutting. 

    Although the region is now moving toward second cutting, hay yields and quality have been impacted by adverse weather. With the supply situation little improved, strong demand for new crop hay is driving prices toward levels not seen since 2008.

    In the Columbia Basin, harvest timelines are running between two and three weeks later than usual. First cutting of alfalfa in the Southern Basin began the last week in May and ended mid-June. Early first cutting was rained on heavily, and damaged hay was either sold directly to area dairies or green chopped.

    It’s expected that all of the first cutting in the Southern Basin received at least some rain. Growers in the Northern Columbia Basin completed first cutting during the second to last week of June. It is estimated that between 75 and 80 percent of the alfalfa in the Northern Basin was rained on. Overall, yields were average to above average, but quality was off due to rain damage.

    At the end of June, prices for new crop alfalfa in the Columbia Basin were running as high as $260 per ton at the stack for supreme quality. Prices for premium alfalfa were between $225 and $235, and between $215 and $225 per ton for good quality at the stack. In some cases, even fair-quality alfalfa traded above $200 per ton and lower-quality, rain-damaged hay sold for $150 per ton.

    Second cutting in the Southern Basin began the last week in June and harvest will be in full swing by the first week of July. As the weather warms, there is some thought that the season will improve. Although growers north of I-90 advise they’ll be limited to three cuttings, hay producers in Othello and Mattawa have indicated the possibility of four.

    The market for timothy hay was strong last year, and growers are expecting another year of profitable prices. Most growers in the Columbia Basin completed first cutting timothy during the last week of June, and Kittitas Valley producers should be mostly wrapped-up with first cutting the first week in July.

    Interest in timothy is reportedly picking up, with prices mainly between $240 and $265 depending on quality. USDA Market News reported the sale of 600 tons of premium quality timothy at $280 per ton for export.

    In Idaho, first cutting of alfalfa was delayed two to three weeks, and rain and cool weather continue to hamper the crop. Any hay cut prior to June 10 was rained on heavily. Second cutting will begin the last week in June. Due to the delay, predictions are that the area is likely to lose one cutting this year, and overall yield will be down 1.5 tons.

    Alfalfa is in high demand from dairies, and at the end of June first-cutting supreme-quality alfalfa was selling between $220 and $240 per ton at the stack. Although prices for supreme-quality hay had reached upwards of $260 per ton for early first cutting, dairies are mainly resisting prices above $250 per ton despite limited supplies.

    Premium hay had been selling between $225 and $235 per ton, and good hay for near $210 per ton. Low-quality rain-damaged hay sold for $145 per ton. For perspective, premium-quality hay sold for $150 per ton in December 2010.

    Harvest timelines are running a week to two weeks behind in Oregon’s Klamath Basin. As of the last week in June, first cutting was between 75 and 85 percent complete. Yields were reported below average, and the area experienced some fairly significant rain on June 28.

    A number of growers had not yet begun their first cutting, but planned to be in the field by July 1. (The cool weather allowed these growers to avoid the rain without the crop becoming over mature.) Prices in the region’s hay market were just being established, but USDA Market News confirmed the sale of 400 tons of supreme alfalfa for $250 per ton at the stack at the end of June.

    Anecdotally, premium-quality hay had been priced in the $220 to $230 per ton range, and feeder hay between $190 and $200. The Klamath Basin is seeing strong demand from both in- and out-of-state buyers looking to secure inventories.

    Primarily the market for first-cutting alfalfa is being driven by dairy demand. With hay acres down across the Northwest and expected lower yields on this year’s crop, dairymen don’t expect prices to soften much during the year. Because many dairies have been forced to buy hay hand-to-mouth, the supply gap between the end winter and first cutting 2011 meant that some dairies were almost out of hay.

    At this point, higher milk prices are allowing dairies to cash-flow higher hay prices, and dairies that are desperate for hay are willing to buy at nearly any level of quality to lock up needed supplies.

    Generally, exporters are taking a cautious approach to the market, not wanting a repeat of 2008 when prices got so high buyers backed-off. Many exporters were forced to write down high-priced hay inventories when the hay market crashed. Although exporters are anxious about procuring needed supplies, the price of first cutting is too costly given the low quality.

    Instead exporters are focused on second cutting, which they hope will be of higher quality. A risk, though, is that if prices remain high and the Northwest is unable to produce a consistent supply of high-quality hay, export customers may turn to other markets for hay.

    Good news for Northwest exporters is that the market is strong. According to the most recent data available from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Northwest hay exports rebounded strongly between December 2010 and March 2011.

    Last summer began a trend where California hay exports exceeded those of the Northwest (for the first time ever). Referencing the graph below, hay exports from the Northwest in March were up 26 percent from February, and 35 percent year-over-year.

    071311_hayprices

     

    Exports to Japan from the Northwest were up 19 percent year-over-year in March and exports to other countries were up 58 percent. With respect to Japan, concerns over the impact of the tsunami on Northwest hay exports, so far, have proved unfounded.

    Japan remains in the market for hay. Recognizing the tight supply situation this year, Japanese buyers have been fairly aggressive in negotiating for hay. Another positive factor is that China’s domestic supply of hay is down this year.

    Overall, prices in Northwest alfalfa market are expected to maintain traction due to lower yields and fewer acres in production in 2011. Northwest dairies and exporters will compete heavily for second cutting, and California dairies and exporters are likely to enter the market searching for additional supplies of hay.

    The significant hay shortage on the West Coast will likely find only limited relief as additionally new crop alfalfa becomes available. The reality is that supplies are tight, and weather for the remainder of the season will ultimately dictate how short the crop really is.  FG

    —Source: Northwest Farm Credit Services newsletter, July 2011

    Graphic courtesy of Northwest Farm Credit Service
    Graphic sources: U.S. Department of Commerce, Hoyt Report, and USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service (Northwest average alfalfa price includes Idaho, Oregon and Washington)

    Hay Feeder: Hauling hay with a school bus – ingenuity at work!

     

     

    Check out this neat article from Progressive Forage Grower that shows the ingenuity of a farmer in Kansas complete with a video of his hay hauling technique.

    Although Barn World doesn’t offer hay haulers like the school bus below, we do have a large selection of hay feeders and other livestock equipment and livestock supplies for your farm and ranch.  Be sure to check out Barn World for everything from saddle pads to cattle guards, to hay feeders.

    Learn a new way to haul hay with a school bus PDF Print E-mail
    Written by Alisa Anderson
    ShareThis
    Updated June 23, 2011

    Instead of hauling one or two bales at a time with his tractor, David Anderson used his brain to save time.

    He converted a school bus into a bale hauler.

    Anderson has two bale haulers – a round bale hauler and a square bale hauler. The square bale hauler can pick up and haul 12 three-by-three bales, or eight four-by-four bales, and the round bale hauler can pick up and haul seven to eight round bales.

    Two hydraulic arms squeeze the sides of the bale and lift the bale to the “table” on top of the bus cab. The table lifts up at an angle, and the bales slide down to the back of the bed, which is set up at an angle. When you are ready to unload, the forks at the end of the bed drop down, and as you drive away the bales slide off.

    “I can mount the hauler on any type of vehicle; you just have to change the angle of the bed and the points of your lift arms,” says Anderson.

    Anderson purchased an old school bus from a school district to mount the bale hauler on. The bus has an automatic transmission so the driver won’t wear out the clutch, has a diesel engine, drives faster than a tractor and uses farm-grade diesel.

    Used school buses usually don’t cost more than $4,000 and have been kept in excellent condition. Anderson paid $2,000 for his first bus. He says if you use flotation tires, they won’t compact the soil, but Anderson just uses the tires that were on the bus. The flat surface on top of the cab gives the hay hauler good stability, even on a hillside.

    Anderson bought a 28-horsepower Kubota engine to independently drive his hydraulics. It uses the same electrical system, generator and fuel tank on the bus, and only uses about a gallon an hour. He installed an electric clutch pump that uses a fan belt to drive the hydraulics. It’s slower than an engine- mounted pump, but also much cheaper.

    “I used electric instead of hydraulic so I wouldn’t have to run all the hoses into the cab,” says Anderson.

    Anderson is working to build a kit that can be sold at local dealers. Farmers could then buy their own vehicles and mount the hauler on them.

    “It’s so time-consuming to just pick up only one or two bales, and drive back and forth and back and forth over the field. This way it just saves time. There are comparable machines on the market, but they’re very expensive,” says Anderson.  FG

    For more information and photos e-mail Dsonhay@aol.com

    The video was featured in the June 16, 2011 issue of The Jewell County Record and The Superior Express newspapers)

     

     

     

    Hay Hopper Hay Feeder from Barn World – a hay feedeer designed to minimize waste and maximize profits!

    The Hay Hopper Hay Feeder

     

    hay feeder - hay feeder hopper

    Here’s a great video demonstrating the cost savings of our hay hopper hay feeder at Barn World.  This great design minimizes hay feeder waste and maximizes your profits.  The hay feeder ships as 2 pieces and ships competitively throughout the United States.  Call us today for shipping quote and start saving money immediately and take a look at all of our hay feeders that we have to offer.   Don’t forget Barn World is more than just livestock supplies, we also carry everything from cattle guards to saddle pads to feed bins.  Visit Barn World.com today or call 720.238.2190  for all your farm and ranch supplies.

    Sorry, but the phone number listed in the video is no longer accurate.  Please call 720.238.2190

    Video Text:
    If you’re looking for a heavy-duty hay feeder that will pay for itself, then you’ve come to the right place.  Our hay hopper feeder will help eliminate waste.  If you’re currently using a standard a feeder, you could be losing 10% of your hay.  If your hay is $100 per ton, and you feed 2000 pounds per day, you’re losing $10 per day, $300 per month or $3600 per year.

    Though continue to throw away your hard-earned money, purchase a hay hopper feeder from the Barn World Farm & Ranch Superstore, you can put more of your money in your pocket at the end of the year.  Our hay hopper feeder comes with or without steel around the bottom.  Just let us know what you want by giving us a call at 720-238-2190 and start saving your money.

    Our two-piece design makes shipping affordable anywhere in the US.

    Hay Feeder Review from Barn World – here’s an awesome portable go anywhere hay feeder!

    BarnWorld.com

     

    HealthEZ hay feeder review from Barn World

     

    The HealthEZ hay feeder is a simple, rugged and neat hay feeder.  It is an extremely durable portable hay feeder that’s lightweight and a breeze to use.  No more messing with stuffing a hay next.    Of all the hay feeders we offer, the Health EZ is the most versatile.  It’s great traveling to shows as it hangs in the trailer and just about anywhere when you arrive at a show or where ever you may be trailering to.

    It was recently voted Tack’N Togs best new product for 2010:

    “The innovative Health E-Z Hay Feeder, a portable feeding solution, can be hung low for natural “heads-down” grazing position, improving respiratory health and reducing incidence of sand colic. Slows down consumption and keeps hay off the ground and out of bedding or manure. Safe for all sizes of horses.”

     

    Here are some of the great features of the hay feeder:

     

  • Can be hung low to the ground to encourage natural equine eating habits that improve your horse’s respiratory system.
  • The rounded edges of the Health EZ Hay Feeder are safety-oriented. No more rope burns!
  • The oval openings are designed with the horse’s muzzle in mind – smooth and just wide enough to fit the nose through.
  • Easy to fill while still hanging on the wall of the stall or trailer.
  • Handles allow the Health EZ Hay Feeder to be carried and hung most anywhere: in a stall, on a trailer, on the corral fence or paddock.
  • Comes with 3/8″ rope and snap for easy use and hanging.
  • Slows down consumption time for better digestion, replicating Nature’s way of slow grazing.
  • Keeps your horse preoccupied with getting the hay out, resulting in less boredom.
  • With openings on all sides, your horse can always reach the hay, no matter how he turns it.
  • Stall cleaning is easier and faster with less hay to pick up and throw away. Less mixing of hay and bedding!
  • The functional design catches smaller pieces of hay in the bottom instead of falling to the ground, resulting in less waste and loss.
  • The Health EZ Hay Feeder is an ideal hay feeder for all your grazing animals, including goats, cattle and sheep
  •  

    Call Barn World today or visit www.BarnWorld.com and try this new hay feeder.  Remember, Barn World has more then equine supplies, we carry a full line of farm and ranch equipment and everything from saddle pads to cattle guards too!