Horse hay feeder from Hay Hut – A great horse round bale feeder!

Barn WorldBarn World now carries the Hay Hut hay feeder!

 As the entire country is affected by the drought, the cost of feeding your livestock continues to rise.  It’s now more important then ever to minimize waste from feeding.

Barn World carries a large selection of hay feeders to minimize waste and provide increase profits.  The Hay Hut hay feeder is a great horse hay feeder that is so easy to use and simple in design that feeding round bales to your animals is a cinch.

Horse Hay Feeder

In addition to the actual hay/cost savings, the use of large bale hay significantly reduces Labor costs and these Hayhuts help to minimise pasture stress in overstock situations and during poor forage growing conditions.

It is interesting to note how well these units stop ‘big bale bickering’ and also how they bring a strong air of calmness and contentedness across the ranch as the horses all know that they have a constant source of forage.

The unit ships in two halves with simple build instructions and takes approximately 30 minutes to bolt together. They are very easy to move, manage, load and maintain

The Hayhut is a robust, durable, and UV stabilized covered hay feeder made of polyethylene and hence it cannot rust and does not require any maintenance unlike the majority of metal feeders.

 

The Hayhut is a full 84 inches in depth so that it can accommodate the largest of round rolls now being produced in the USA and up to twenty conventional square bales or the majority of big square bales. This additional depth also allows it to be easily pushed back over very large bales, even if they have been placed on a pallet, without catching the top lip of the feeder on the bale.

It is 84 inches high so that there is plenty of headroom for the use of a pallet while still allowing for good airflow and cooling over the top of the bale.

Hayhut will fit in the back of pickup. The width of 72 inches allows up to three units (in six halves) to be transported easily in a standard bed pick-up truck (see photo).

The Hayhut is delivered in halves to reduce shipping costs and a single half unit can be ordered. A half unit can be mounted against a wall or hard structure for use with conventional square bales. It can also be mounted against a fence with a locally purchased plywood back attached for weather protection

This half unit measures 42″ x 72″ x 84″ and has four feeding windows.

The unit ships in two halves with simple build instructions and takes approximately 30 minutes to bolt together. They are very easy to move, manage, load and maintain and we have many testimonials to that effect. The Hayhut is supplied with all assembly hardware and a lifting eye for relocation purposes. It can also be relocated with a round roll by inserting the roll inside the unit. Just see our video to see how easy it is to move.

Hayhuts are warranted for 1 year. Similar units of identical material from the same manufacturer have been examined after 6 years of 24/7 use in Missouri and this leads us to believe that Hayhuts should provide at least 10 years of good service which is an outstanding return on investment.They are designed and manufactured to accommodate all sizes of round rolls up to 1600 lbs. We have incorporated bigger windows for larger horses up to 17hh and anchor points for windy conditions.

Here’s a great demonstration video:

http://youtu.be/G8rjnBk1wh4

Below are just some of the happy customers we have using Hayhuts. 
Please contact us for more information or if you wish to provide a testimonial about how Hayhut hay feeders work for you.

Gottado Ranch, Ocala – April 2011
We purchased 2 Hay Huts at an equine event in Ocala, FL. They are easy to set up and use. As soon as we had them in the field the horses came over to check it out. They were eating out of it before we left. We had a really bad rainstorm about 3 days after we started using our Hay Huts. I went out after the storm to check the hay inside the huts. The hay was bone dry! The wind did not even blow rain in the windows. The horses love it and none of them fight. There is no manure or urine in the hay because the Hay Hut prevents this. This results in almost all of the hay in the Hay Hut is being used as food rather than bedding. Thank you Hay Hut for a great product that saves time and money. We plan on purchasing another Hay Hut before next winter.

January 2011
Thank you so much
for your courtesy and help as I decided whether or not to buy your Hayhuts product, for Potomac Glen Riding School . Since we have four paddocks at Potomac Glen, each containing 5 to 7 horses, we needed at least four Hayhuts, and I was initially very concerned about what I thought might be an expensive investment.

I am very pleased 
to report that the four Hayhuts I purchased have exceeded my wildest hopes of better hay usage & economy. Without a doubt, the Hayhuts have halved my round bale usage in just the last few months, thereby cutting my hay costs substantially. The Hayhuts have eliminated hay waste by keeping the horses from sleeping & defecating on the round bale hay. They also keep the ice, snow and rain off the round bales so I no longer lose a lot of hay. The Hayhuts have also eliminated the typical wasted mound of unusable hay, and the horses eat all of the round bale hay and leave only dust. My quality if life has improved because, in addition to saving on my round bale hay costs, I have also cut my work load substantially by feeding the bales to my horses only once a week, instead of two times a week, and the paddock clean up is virtually non-existent! Thank you again for your Hayhuts. When finances permit, I will be adding two more Hayhuts to the riding school. I will be happy to talk to anyone who is interested in Hayhuts. They can contact me at (301)601-0622, or our website is www.potomacglenridingschool.com. I will be happy to tell them about my experiences and to heartily recommend Hayhuts!
Susan Hansen Potomac Glen Riding School 24201 Clarksburg Road Clarksburg , MD 20871 2.

January 2011
Eliminates almost all waste!
Just a note to tell you I don’t think you were totally truthful with me when we talked about the hay hut: you said I could probably reduce hay waste by about 30%… well I have now fed two round bales out of the hut and am COMPLETELY CONVINCED waste is almost totally non existent! I watch the horses eat every day at some time or other and it seems when they do drag a mouthful out of the hut and drop it, that before they stick their heads back in they almost always pick up what they have dropped and eat it first. If there is a mouthful laying on the ground when they first walk up to the hut they usually pick it up and eat it first! They have developed really good “table” manners. I would bet out of the two bales fed so far, not even three (YES 3!) pounds of hay has been wasted and when it has snowed it was totally protected. The price initially, did seem high but with the price of hay it will pay for itself in very short order, well worth the investment for sure! Thanks for delivering and helping me get started assembling it and Thanks for a GREAT product!

AUGUST 21st 2010
The Hay Hut is really working out well!
The horses love it. Little to no waste on the hay. The hay stays dry, and no fussing. We did learn to set the hay on end instead of the side, as on the side they were able to peal layers off and out. Not so when it’s sitting on end. Carole (Missouri)

MAY 1st 2010
I just wanted to tell you that I put up 2 huts in my fields for my 5 horses and the 2 round bales lasted 3 weeks! I was feeding 4 bales of hay/day and at $4-$5/bale/day, that was about $16-$20/day. With the Hayhuts I am only spending about $4/day! I love them! Thanks, Kelly Melberg Winlock, Wa

A letter from Pennsylvania

We wanted to drop you a note and let you know how satisfied we are with your product. We purchased three units from you in July ’09. The units were assembled and put in the pastures once we received them. We started feeding hay on and off from October until December. Starting in December we began feeding fulltime from the feeders.

Our hay usage has shown a dramatic decrease. We do not see the large hay/manure piles that we routinely had using conventional round bale feeders. By this time each winter I am usually looking for sources of hay; our barn still has enough to last us for another two months. We have the largest number of horses that we ever have had on the farm, we have used less hay than we used to with fewer animals. We have fed small square bales, large round bales and large square bales in the feeders: they handle all of these varieties without any problems at all.

We are feeding animals in a variety of sizes and breeds. They all readily use the feeders without any problems. We are feeding our foals, yearlings, broodmares, miniature donkeys and a large Thoroughbred and Irish Sport horse on these feeders. We have three pastures running at the present time, one feeder has five horses on it, one has ten broodmares and the other has six geldings and two donkeys.

Assembly of the units was easy and took only around 20 minutes per hut. The green color blends in well with our fields and makes the huts easy to find in snow drifts, lol. Ordering and delivery were easy and I believe we will easily recover the cost of the units by the end of this year or the beginning of next. The amount of hay saved and a decrease in wasted hay/manure mixed is unbelievable.

We would highly recommend your product to anyone feeding horses round bales of hay or even small bales. The quality of the huts, the cost, the performance and your customer service have made purchasing and using these units a pleasure.

Thank you, The Hillards Pat and Kathy Hillard

City of Houston Mounted Patrol
Hayhuts are everything they say they are and more. We’ve had 4 Hayhuts for over 5 months now and have already recognized a savings with less waste. All 38 Police Horses love the Hayhuts as there is always fresh clean hay available to them when they are turned out. There is no fighting over the hay and no injuries caused by the Hayhuts. We have all sizes and breeds of horses at the Houston Mounted Patrol and all of them love the Hayhuts. Hayhuts prove the simplest designs are usually the best. Our horses thank you for making such a great product!” – Sgt. Leslie Wills, Houston Mounted Patrol

Road to the Horse Chris Cox uses Hayhut Hayhuts save and preserve the hay. They keep the hay weather protected and are horse friendly.” – Chris Cox

Nebraska Blizzard
Hay Feeders for Horses
Hi Denis, Just thought I’d let you know the Hayhuts made it through their first Nebraska blizzard just fine! I thought I may find them either full of snow or blown across my feeding area, but, neither was the case. They stayed in place, no snow was inside and the horses had plenty to eat all through the storm! – Mary Anne G. – Nebraska From using one round bale every 3-3 1/2 days to every 5-5 1/2 days I have been using the amazing Hayhuts for not quite a year now. I was about done with round bales before I found these. The horses would waste so much. We had one paddock where we were feeding 1 round bale every 3 to 3 1/2 days. When we started using the Hayhut it went to 5, 5 1/2 days sometimes even 6 days. I am now using 1/2 a Hayhut in a shed and another on the fence line. We throw small square bales or flakes of hay. There is no waste doing that. When you feed alfalfa to the babies they do not stand on it any more. They love their hay hut. If you ever use one you will not let it go. What a great invention.
– Karen Bruce, Irish Oaks Farm

The mini can eat there too
“Well it’s been a week and I LOVE it. Loads of rain and all the hay dry. The mini can eat there too, if I put hay high or just put bale under opening. Another satisfied customer. Thanks!” – Vicki – Florida

 

Be sure to feed smart this summer and receive the economical benefits and ease of use the Horse Hut Hay Feeder offers.

Also visit Barn World today for all of your livestock supplies needs.  We also carry a large selection of cattle guards, hay feeders, grain bins and even 5 Star saddle pads.

Horse Tack Post: 5 Star Saddle Pads at Barn World

Barn World Logo

Saddle pads

Saddle Pads from 5 Star are at Barn World

Barn World, your best source for equine tack, is proud to offer the best quality saddle pads and cinches available.  5 Star saddle pads and cinches are hand made to order and offer French Contouring to ensure a proper fit for your horse or mule.  The unique saddle pad design allows it to conform to your horse’s back and provide the best fit for equine performance and comfort.

We are so impressed with the 100% wool saddle pads and simplicity of design, that we believe everyone could benefit from using them.

Here’s a quick video and text from Laurel:

“A lot of gimmicks can be strapped under a saddle to get one benefit or another, but man has yet to create a product that outperforms virgin wool, and over the long haul, virgin wool content felt pads will outperform any other type of pad or blanket hands down. 5 stars 100% percent wool contoured saddle pads conform immediately to your horse’s back for perfect fit. Our F-11 wool felt has the highest virgin wool content available and offers 3 times more compression protection and wicking ability than any other pad on the market. While the importance of compression protection is pretty clear given the dominance of rubber, bubble wrap and space age jelly saddle pads today, only high quality wool felt offers great compression protection while simultaneously wicking away moisture. That wicking action is the means by which heat is dissipated under the pressure of the saddle. The best compression protection, coupled with the best wicking ability, translates to the best performance from your equine partner. When you consider the amount of money one might spend on feed, tack, vet bills and entry fees to pursue your equine passion, a saddle pad with all the ingredients for maximum performance is essential. While the big ships full of cheap goods leave a toxic trail all the way from Los Angeles to China and back, 5 Star is producing the highest quality products right here in the USA.”

From Mike:  “In the last 20 years the industry has come up with using every conceivable kind of thing out of the auto industry and space industry that was never intended for use in horses. Everything from gels to foams to freezer linings all of these have zero or next to nothing as far as good quality and compression protection and absolutely zero in wicking ability and the agents that are needed for wicking sweat and heat away from the horses back. Pressed industrial felt is the only thing that has really been proven over time to have the high quality wicking ability and high compression ratio for horses. 5 Star has 3 times the compression ratio of any other pad on the market and has 2 times the wicking ability of any close competitor in the felt industry as far as pads are concerned. So why is 5 Star so good? 5 Star uses the highest quality virgin wool content in their felt. Only through the use of high-quality virgin wool, can you have a high-quality compression ratios and the high wicking quality you can get. Add to that,5 Stars established French curve that will fit any horse backline that settles in to create high-quality performance. 5 Star is a pad that will last forever, kind of like an old sweater that you snag and you throw away so that you have a chance to get a new one. Nothing makes it simpler for performance and making 5 Star the best pad in your tack room.”

Some pointers from 5 Star for use when selecting a saddle pad:

  • If the saddles don’t fit they can push pads out the back.
  • A saddle tree may be warped if it pushes pad out the back and to the side.
  • If you wouldn’t wear that stuff for underpants or socks why put it on the animal!
  • Synthetic pads have the highest profit margin for makers.
  • Sweat pouring off a back is like you standing on ice with tennis shoes on a hill!
  • Do you like having bandages pulled off your hairy arms? So how do you think tacky material feels to an animal?
  • Wool felt pads are easily cleaned!
  • Synthetic fleeced saddle skirting is slick and will present problems with most pads.
  • Don’t be fooled by Patent Pending in advertising.
  • Synthetic foams are not UV light resistant and break down,
  • Synthetic foams break down from heat and salts of the animal.
  • Fire or strong acids are the only thing that will harm wool.
  • All pads will contract and spread disease when not cleaned if infection exists.
  • Pinch pads with thumb and fingers.  If you can feel the other digit it likely has bad compression protection.
  • Buy for function first, then looks.
  • Don’t be fooled by gimmick terms and pictures.
  • Ask construction specifications of retailer and manufacturer.

For all of your equine tack needs, please visit BarnWorld.com today or call 720.238.2190.

Mineral Licks and Mineral Feeders – essential for keeping healthy livestock

Mineral Feeders or Mineral Licks are very economical and low maintenance means of provide essential minerals to you livestock.  Keep a steady supply of minerals in a mineral feeder or lick feeder for a healthy animal.

Below is a great article from Working Ranch about the importance of getting your livestock the minerals they need during the winter months. and the attention to the type of supplement quality and quantity.

Barn World also carries a large selection of troughs and grain feeders as well as a large selection of mineral feeders and mineral licks to help ensure the proper nutrients are a part of the diet.   A mineral feeder is an important part of facilitating the absorption of minerals.

From ground mineral feeders like the Dura Life to the wind vane style mineral feeders like the upright mineral feeder, Barn World has the tools to make sure your animals remain healthy all season long.

 

 

Make sure your cows are nutritionally ready

From Working Ranch 

– by Gilda V. Bryant

– photo by Lucie Wiese


Mineral Feeder
Mineral Feeder

 

Minerals are important for herd health, reproduction and efficiency during winter. However, that is only part of the picture.  Extra protein and energy are vital during cold, wet weather.  Producers should also be aware of forage and by-product supplementation quality, as well as body condition scores.

 

“The challenge with minerals is there’s just no single answer,” says Rick Rasby, PhD, PAS (Professional Animal Scientist), Beef Extension Specialist, University of Nebraska (Lincoln).  “Think about minerals as part of a total diet those animals are eating.”

Rasby encourages producers to sample baled forages for moisture content, protein, energy and mineral profiles.  Once a producer knows his forage quality, he can adjust the mineral package for his herd.  He says, “Use the mineral as a supplement to bridge the deficiency gap in those forages that are being consumed.”

He also recommends that producers analyze samples of supplemental feed such as gin trash, cotton seed, or distiller’s grains.

Many regions with ethanol plants have distiller’s grains available for the cow/calf sector.  Rasby says, “It’s an excellent feed, works well with forages, and is high in protein, energy and phosphorus as well.”

Typically low in winter forages, phosphorus is a mineral that’s vital for bone and teeth development, and metabolic, neurological and cellular functions in cattle.  It’s also one of the most expensive minerals to supplement.  According to Rasby, reducing or omitting phosphorus from the mineral package when feeding distillers grains can save money.  Get advice from a nutritionist or beef extension specialist about adjusting nutrient values when feeding these supplemental rations.

In addition to minerals, protein and energy, utilizing body condition scores (BCS) is a management practice that cow/calf operators can implement on a regular basis. Scores range between one and nine with one being a very poor specimen and nine being obese.

Rasby adds, “Having mature cows in condition score five at calving not only has an impact on what happens at calving, but also on how quickly those cows are ready to rebreed after calving.  Those first-calf heifers probably need to be in a little bit better condition, say conditioning score six.

“Cows that breed early in the breeding season are in the right nutritional status.  Their calves are older at weaning and generate more dollars,” explains Rasby.

Is it right?

How can a cattleman determine if his mineral supplement and diet are on target? “Measure how they perform at calving,” replies Rasby.  “Are they good mothers?  Do they give enough milk? Does the calf perform well while it’s on its mother?  How quickly does the cow get ready to rebreed?”

Providing minerals is crucial to the Thomas Angus Ranch outside of Baker City, Oregon. Located in a valley between two mountain ranges, and flanked by sagebrush hills, owner Rob Thomas says, “We have long, fairly hard winters.”

He provides a custom mineral mix to his spring and fall calving herds, depending on forage analysis to fine-tune the supplement package.  Thomas says, “We increased levels of zinccopper, and selenium, the three minerals we’re deficient in.”

Beginning in November when snow is on the ground, he’ll feed alfalfa and grass hay.  He says, “We put up a lot of our own hay, so we feed what we put up.  We test our feed to see what minerals we need.”

As a result of their efforts he reports, “We have healthier cattle, better immune response, fewer treatments and a lower death loss.  We see increases in reproduction and gain and better feed utilization, which is important right now.  With extremely high feed prices, we want to utilize every bit of that feed, if possible.”

Across the country, Kevin Yon raises Angus cattle in the mild winters of west central South Carolina.  He provides three mineral mixes: summer, winter, and one for young growing livestock.  Yon says, “Our winter mineral program doesn’t differ drastically from our summer mineral program.  We include a higher level of magnesium to prevent grass tetany.  If all goes well we hope to have lush grazing on a limited basis, even in December and for sure in February and March.”

His winter diet includes stockpiled forages such as Fescue or Bermuda grass.  When possible, Yon likes to have rye grass or small-grain winter annuals on hand.  He explains, “It could be a combination of those and sometimes we’ll use a protein or energy supplement, which could be commodity by-products, such as whole cotton seed, dried distillers grains or corn gluten.”

He analyzes feed, grains and commodity by-products, seeking advice from a nutritionist to adjust his mineral program as needed.

“It’s important to have a year-round high-quality mineral program,” Yon advises. “That’s not always the cheapest bag of mineral, but it has the high levels that are needed for cattle in your area.  The cheapest bag is not always the best.”

Yon finds that his cattle have a more consistent consumption if he allows free choice at all times.  He says, “Know what the consumption rate should be and monitor that. In our part of the world, a covered mineral trough is important so the mineral doesn’t get wet, cake up and the cattle don’t eat it.

“As a producer, I see the benefit of minerals.” Yon explains, “The biggest for us is reproduction, cow herd efficiency, immune response, cattle health, and growth and development.  At our place we try to feed a cow as cheap as we can because 60-70 percent of our annual cost involves nutrition.  We don’t see that minerals are the place to skimp.”

Thomas also recommends feeding minerals, saying, “Do it based on science.  Go ahead and get a forage analysis based on what you’re feeding and do that every time you get a new batch of feed, so you know what you’re feeding and what minerals you need to add to the ration.”

Rasby says, “To be competitive, you’re really going to have to watch feed costs. How you put together feeding programs to meet your herd’s nutritional needs is going to be critical.”

To find a list of certified feed testing laboratories, check out: www.foragetesting.org.

 


PROTEIN AND ENERGY

“Minerals don’t do much if you’re not doing a good job of covering your water, energy, and protein needs for those cows,” advises Ken Bryan, PAS, and Ruminant Specialist with Cargill.  “A balanced diet is important because you have the added stress of environmental conditions like cold, wet weather, mud and wind, which are going to increase the cow’s nutritional requirements.”

Adequate amounts of energy and protein are critical during winter conditions. “If a cow will eat twenty-four pounds of dry matter in forage, she’s going to get all the energy she needs,” Bryan explains.  “If that rumen is functioning well, she’ll break down the fiber and utilize that feed.  That’s your energy source.”

Protein, a much-needed nutrient in cattle diets, is composed of true protein andnonprotein nitrogen.  Protein in forages will gradually decline, providing less protein as winter progresses, with a higher percentage of fiber.  “The nasty thing about fiber is a high fiber, low quality forage diet will restrict intake,” Bryan says.  “Now we’re going to supplement with a protein source.  The nice thing is, there are options for protein supplementation.”

“There’s the old standby, cake or range cubes, protein tubs or blocks and leftovers from oil seed products such as sunflower, cotton seed, or soybean meal and distillers grains from corn.  Look at the most economical way to deliver protein to the cow.”

Bryan cautions, “We’ve got to keep a minimum amount of fiber in that diet as we feed energy supplements.  We’re going to cause some long- term changes in that cow’s rumen… we’ll ruin her if we feed her like a feedlot steer.”

Hoof Stands and Farrier Supplies from Barn World

 

    Barn World

 

Hoof Stands from Barn World

 

At Barn World, we’ve come across a lot of great products and one that has stood out  with it’s ability and ease of use is the Hoof-It hoof stand.  Whether working on a large draft horse hoof, a standard horse hoof  or small hoofed animals such as ponies, smaller horse breeds and older horses, there is a hoof stand available to make the back breaking chore of trimming a hoof much, much easier.

The HOOF-it®  Hoof Stand, designed by farrier Steve Samet, features a new modern design which integrates the post and cradle to create a “two-in-one” unit. This combo design allows the user to easily switch from the standard hoof cradle to the draft cradle in order to work on and shoe a wide range of hoof sizes.

The cradle and post are covered with a shock-absorbing rubber material that provides a comfortable support for the horse, while the wide base unit provides added stability and safety for the user.

The hoof stands are available in three sizes and in a combination stand:

Please check out the instructional hoof stand video below to see just how easy working on a hoof can be with the hoof stand.

 

 

The HOOF-it® ‘All in One’ Hoof Stand

Hoof care the easy & comfortable way! Easy on the horse and the user, the Hoof-it® Stand gives you both the post and cradle integrated into one, innovative hoof stand. Do yourself a favor! Take the pain out of your back and knees with the New Hoof Stand from HOOF-it® Technologies

The HOOF-it® ‘All in One’ Hoof Stand, designed by Farrier Steve Samet, features a shock absorbing, integrated rubber cradle and hoof post into one easy to use unit.

The Hoof Stand provides a stable and safe support for the horse, allowing it to relax without putting all of it’s weight on you.

For additional safety and stability when working with the Hoof-it®Stand try the following:

* keep on foot on the base unit when working with the Hoof® Stand

* do not leave the horses leg or hoof in the cradle or on the stand, when unattended.

Benefits for Farrier’s, Veterinarians and horse Owners who use the HOOF-it® Hoof Stand:

√ Easy to use “All in One” innovative, design integrates both the post and cradle in to one.

√ The innovative design of the HOOF-it® Hoof Stand dramatically reduces your risk of getting injured during hoof care tasks.

√ The HOOF-it Stand is ideally suited for use with all types of horses, including older horses that require special support and comfort during hoof care tasks.

√ The rubber cushioned Cradle fits different hoof sizes and hugs the hoof.

Let HOOF-it® Hoof Stand deal with the majority of the horses weight during any type of hoof care tasks, rather than your back or knees.

Visit www.BarnWorld.com today to see all of Barn World’s farrier supplies and livestock supplies.

 

 

Farrier Supplies: Hoof Stands – a real back saver. Hoof Stands for Horses of all sizes at Barn World!

 

Barn World

 

Hoof Stands from Barn World

 

At Barn World, we’ve come across a lot of great products and one that has stood out  with it’s ability and ease of use is the Hoof-It hoof stand.  Whether working on a large draft horse hoof, a standard horse hoof  or small hoofed animals such as ponies, smaller horse breeds and older horses, there is a hoof stand available to make the back breaking chore of trimming a hoof much, much easier.

The HOOF-it®  Hoof Stand, designed by farrier Steve Samet, features a new modern design which integrates the post and cradle to create a “two-in-one” unit. This combo design allows the user to easily switch from the standard hoof cradle to the draft cradle in order to work on and shoe a wide range of hoof sizes.

The cradle and post are covered with a shock-absorbing rubber material that provides a comfortable support for the horse, while the wide base unit provides added stability and safety for the user.

The hoof stands are available in three sizes and in a combination stand:

Please check out the instructional hoof stand video below to see just how easy working on a hoof can be with the hoof stand.

 

Hoof Stands

The HOOF-it® ‘All in One’ Hoof Stand

Hoof care the easy & comfortable way! Easy on the horse and the user, the Hoof-it® Stand gives you both the post and cradle integrated into one, innovative hoof stand. Do yourself a favor! Take the pain out of your back and knees with the New Hoof Stand from HOOF-it® Technologies

The HOOF-it® ‘All in One’ Hoof Stand, designed by Farrier Steve Samet, features a shock absorbing, integrated rubber cradle and hoof post into one easy to use unit.

The Hoof Stand provides a stable and safe support for the horse, allowing it to relax without putting all of it’s weight on you.

For additional safety and stability when working with the Hoof-it®Stand try the following:

* keep on foot on the base unit when working with the Hoof® Stand

* do not leave the horses leg or hoof in the cradle or on the stand, when unattended.

Benefits for Farrier’s, Veterinarians and horse Owners who use the HOOF-it® Hoof Stand:

√ Easy to use “All in One” innovative, design integrates both the post and cradle in to one.

√ The innovative design of the HOOF-it® Hoof Stand dramatically reduces your risk of getting injured during hoof care tasks.

√ The HOOF-it Stand is ideally suited for use with all types of horses, including older horses that require special support and comfort during hoof care tasks.

√ The rubber cushioned Cradle fits different hoof sizes and hugs the hoof.

Let HOOF-it® Hoof Stand deal with the majority of the horses weight during any type of hoof care tasks, rather than your back or knees.

Visit www.BarnWorld.com today to see all of Barn World’s farrier supplies and livestock supplies.

Mineral Feeders and Mineral Licks – an important component to keeping your livestock healthy year-round

Here is a great article from Working Ranch about the importance of getting your livestock the minerals they need during the winter months. and the attention to the type of supplement quality and quantity.

Barn World’s carries a large selection of troughs and grain feeders to help keep your livestock healthy.

Barn World also carries a large selection of mineral feeders and mineral licks to help ensure the proper nutrients are a part of the diet.   A mineral feeder is an important part of facilitating the absorption of minerals.

From ground mineral feeders like the Dura Life to the wind vane style mineral feeders like the upright mineral feeder, Barn World has the tools to make sure your animals remain healthy all season long.

 

 

Make sure your cows are nutritionally ready

From Working Ranch

– by Gilda V. Bryant

– photo by Lucie Wiese


Mineral Feeder

Mineral Feeder

 

Minerals are important for herd health, reproduction and efficiency during winter. However, that is only part of the picture.  Extra protein and energy are vital during cold, wet weather.  Producers should also be aware of forage and by-product supplementation quality, as well as body condition scores.

 

“The challenge with minerals is there’s just no single answer,” says Rick Rasby, PhD, PAS (Professional Animal Scientist), Beef Extension Specialist, University of Nebraska (Lincoln).  “Think about minerals as part of a total diet those animals are eating.”

Rasby encourages producers to sample baled forages for moisture content, protein, energy and mineral profiles.  Once a producer knows his forage quality, he can adjust the mineral package for his herd.  He says, “Use the mineral as a supplement to bridge the deficiency gap in those forages that are being consumed.”

He also recommends that producers analyze samples of supplemental feed such as gin trash, cotton seed, or distiller’s grains.

Many regions with ethanol plants have distiller’s grains available for the cow/calf sector.  Rasby says, “It’s an excellent feed, works well with forages, and is high in protein, energy and phosphorus as well.”

Typically low in winter forages, phosphorus is a mineral that’s vital for bone and teeth development, and metabolic, neurological and cellular functions in cattle.  It’s also one of the most expensive minerals to supplement.  According to Rasby, reducing or omitting phosphorus from the mineral package when feeding distillers grains can save money.  Get advice from a nutritionist or beef extension specialist about adjusting nutrient values when feeding these supplemental rations.

In addition to minerals, protein and energy, utilizing body condition scores (BCS) is a management practice that cow/calf operators can implement on a regular basis. Scores range between one and nine with one being a very poor specimen and nine being obese.

Rasby adds, “Having mature cows in condition score five at calving not only has an impact on what happens at calving, but also on how quickly those cows are ready to rebreed after calving.  Those first-calf heifers probably need to be in a little bit better condition, say conditioning score six.

“Cows that breed early in the breeding season are in the right nutritional status.  Their calves are older at weaning and generate more dollars,” explains Rasby.

Is it right?

How can a cattleman determine if his mineral supplement and diet are on target? “Measure how they perform at calving,” replies Rasby.  “Are they good mothers?  Do they give enough milk? Does the calf perform well while it’s on its mother?  How quickly does the cow get ready to rebreed?”

Providing minerals is crucial to the Thomas Angus Ranch outside of Baker City, Oregon. Located in a valley between two mountain ranges, and flanked by sagebrush hills, owner Rob Thomas says, “We have long, fairly hard winters.”

He provides a custom mineral mix to his spring and fall calving herds, depending on forage analysis to fine-tune the supplement package.  Thomas says, “We increased levels of zinccopper, and selenium, the three minerals we’re deficient in.”

Beginning in November when snow is on the ground, he’ll feed alfalfa and grass hay.  He says, “We put up a lot of our own hay, so we feed what we put up.  We test our feed to see what minerals we need.”

As a result of their efforts he reports, “We have healthier cattle, better immune response, fewer treatments and a lower death loss.  We see increases in reproduction and gain and better feed utilization, which is important right now.  With extremely high feed prices, we want to utilize every bit of that feed, if possible.”

Across the country, Kevin Yon raises Angus cattle in the mild winters of west central South Carolina.  He provides three mineral mixes: summer, winter, and one for young growing livestock.  Yon says, “Our winter mineral program doesn’t differ drastically from our summer mineral program.  We include a higher level of magnesium to prevent grass tetany.  If all goes well we hope to have lush grazing on a limited basis, even in December and for sure in February and March.”

His winter diet includes stockpiled forages such as Fescue or Bermuda grass.  When possible, Yon likes to have rye grass or small-grain winter annuals on hand.  He explains, “It could be a combination of those and sometimes we’ll use a protein or energy supplement, which could be commodity by-products, such as whole cotton seed, dried distillers grains or corn gluten.”

He analyzes feed, grains and commodity by-products, seeking advice from a nutritionist to adjust his mineral program as needed.

“It’s important to have a year-round high-quality mineral program,” Yon advises. “That’s not always the cheapest bag of mineral, but it has the high levels that are needed for cattle in your area.  The cheapest bag is not always the best.”

Yon finds that his cattle have a more consistent consumption if he allows free choice at all times.  He says, “Know what the consumption rate should be and monitor that. In our part of the world, a covered mineral trough is important so the mineral doesn’t get wet, cake up and the cattle don’t eat it.

“As a producer, I see the benefit of minerals.” Yon explains, “The biggest for us is reproduction, cow herd efficiency, immune response, cattle health, and growth and development.  At our place we try to feed a cow as cheap as we can because 60-70 percent of our annual cost involves nutrition.  We don’t see that minerals are the place to skimp.”

Thomas also recommends feeding minerals, saying, “Do it based on science.  Go ahead and get a forage analysis based on what you’re feeding and do that every time you get a new batch of feed, so you know what you’re feeding and what minerals you need to add to the ration.”

Rasby says, “To be competitive, you’re really going to have to watch feed costs. How you put together feeding programs to meet your herd’s nutritional needs is going to be critical.”

To find a list of certified feed testing laboratories, check out: www.foragetesting.org.

 


PROTEIN AND ENERGY

“Minerals don’t do much if you’re not doing a good job of covering your water, energy, and protein needs for those cows,” advises Ken Bryan, PAS, and Ruminant Specialist with Cargill.  “A balanced diet is important because you have the added stress of environmental conditions like cold, wet weather, mud and wind, which are going to increase the cow’s nutritional requirements.”

Adequate amounts of energy and protein are critical during winter conditions. “If a cow will eat twenty-four pounds of dry matter in forage, she’s going to get all the energy she needs,” Bryan explains.  “If that rumen is functioning well, she’ll break down the fiber and utilize that feed.  That’s your energy source.”

Protein, a much-needed nutrient in cattle diets, is composed of true protein andnonprotein nitrogen.  Protein in forages will gradually decline, providing less protein as winter progresses, with a higher percentage of fiber.  “The nasty thing about fiber is a high fiber, low quality forage diet will restrict intake,” Bryan says.  “Now we’re going to supplement with a protein source.  The nice thing is, there are options for protein supplementation.”

“There’s the old standby, cake or range cubes, protein tubs or blocks and leftovers from oil seed products such as sunflower, cotton seed, or soybean meal and distillers grains from corn.  Look at the most economical way to deliver protein to the cow.”

Bryan cautions, “We’ve got to keep a minimum amount of fiber in that diet as we feed energy supplements.  We’re going to cause some long- term changes in that cow’s rumen… we’ll ruin her if we feed her like a feedlot steer.”

Hoof Care and Maintenance Kit from Barn World



BarnWorld.com

Livestock Supplies

Hoof Care and Hoof Maintenance

 


The Hoof-it Maintenance Kit is a great hoof care kit that makes hoof care a breeze.  Hoof maintenance and hoof care for farriers and horse lovers alike and is an easy way to care for your equine and livestock hoofs.

See how simple it is in the following video:

From the video:

Hoof Care and Maintenance Kit:

The Hoof Care and Maintenance Kit is a three step system.

  1. apply sanitizer:  apply sanitizer to the hoof to eliminate any bacteria or thrush
  2. apply conditioner:  apply conditioner to strengthen and condition the hoof
  3. apply the hoof strengthener:  the hoof stengthener will act as a clear coat to protect the hoof.  It will also leave the hoof with a nice shiny the gloss.

This very simple and effective system is a surefire way to keep your hoofs healthy and looking good.

Visit Barn World today for all your farrier supplies and needs and remember, we carry a large supply of livestock, farm and ranch supplies.  Barn World offers everything from saddle pads to cattle guards.

Call 720.238.2190 or visit www.BarnWorld.com today!

 

 

Horse handling for new Horse Owners: A general blog from the Health Hoof

Livestock Supplies

 

A general guide for horse handling for new owners – a post from the Healthy Hoof blog.

 

At Barn World, we offer a lot of great livestock products and everything from cattle guards, hay feeders, feed bins and saddle pads.  When discussing the large array of available products with customers, we sometimes lose sight of the fact that a lot of our customers are new to caring for and interacting with livestock, horses and poultry.  As such, I thought I’d include some general posts for those who are new to caring for and owning animals.

If you’d like to share your ideas or comments please feel free and you may always contact Barn World at Sales@BarnWorld.com or call 720-238-2190.

 

 

Recently I came across a good general information blog post from the Healthy Hoof.    It’s a general post, but provides a great initial outline and tips for interacting with your horse.

Horse handling for new horse owners

Even in today’s economy (or maybe because of it), new horse owners pop up every day. An inexperienced client will often purchase an inexperienced horse. It can be a challenge to teach both owner and horse techniques that ensure the safety and cooperation for everyone involved, but also very rewarding to be able to start with a “fresh” owner and essentially create the perfect client/professional relationship.

Did you know that farriers interact with more horses than veterinarians, and even horse trainers? Due to the cyclical nature of hoof care, and horses’ impeccable memories, it is beneficial for me as a hoof care professional to form trusting relationships with my clients’ horses. Horses remember positive and negative experiences, and negative experiences can never be completely erased. This is one reason it is imperative that horse owners choose their hoof care professionals carefully.

I’ve put together a list of basic horse handling techniques below, with a focus on holding a horse for a farrier or trimmer. Many of the techniques also apply to holding your horse for the veterinarian or other equine professionals. These techniques are based on logic, common sense, and my own experiences as a hoof care professional.

It is my hope that these tips will help prevent some foreseeable accidents and possibly save some lives.

Use appropriate and properly fitted tack.
I prefer a rope halter with at least a 12 foot lead. A longer lead may be necessary for a young or green horse, because it can be used to move the horse around should groundwork training come into play. A rope halter is gentle, but uncomfortable if a horse leans into it, unlike standard wide nylon or leather halters. Rope halters are especially effective when working with pushy horses.

Ask your horse to focus on the task at hand.
Encourage him to relax by petting him softly (but not with a brush in the middle of shedding season!). Do not distract your horse with treats or hay, because he may forget that someone is handling his hooves. Feeding horses also causes body weight to shift a lot (especially if they are reaching for a treat), which makes it difficult for your farrier to balance under him. Treats are okay as rewards for good behavior, but the timing must be right.

If a horse misbehaves, correct it, but give warning to your farrier beforehand.
One of the most effective maneuvers for correcting a horse is backing him up – with energy. This does not mean pushing him back with all of your strength, but asking/insisting that the horse back up with your body language. Pushy, dominant, or spoiled horses can be taken down a notch or two by using this technique. It also redirects the horse’s focus back to you and your farrier.

When working on front feet, stand on the opposite side of the horse’s head, facing your farrier and horse at a 45-degree angle.
If you stand facing your horse, your farrier may have difficulty maneuvering around you, or you could be struck by an overly exuberant horse. Stand in a position where you are able to observe your horse’s body language and warn your farrier of behavior that may indicate a dangerous situation. Be aware of the surroundings, and keep children and pets away from the work area.

When working on hind feet, stand on the same side of the horse as your farrier.
Keep the horse’s head slightly tilted towards you so that he can see you and your farrier easily. Keep your horse from turning his head the opposite direction as this will shift his weight onto the hind foot that is off the ground. Your farrier’s back will thank you for this!

When walking or trotting out your horse for gait analysis, keep your horse on a loose lead.
Avoid pulling on your horse’s head as it affects his weight distribution and gait. Give your horse at least 3 feet of lead rope. Teach your horse to trot with you as the trot is a common gait used for identifying lameness and gait abnormalities. A flat, smooth surface where the horse can be walked or trotted in a straight line or circle is desirable in these situations.

I hope this information will prove beneficial for horse owners and equine health professionals. Please feel free to post additional tips as comments, and share/print this article as long as it is credited/linked back to this site.

Mineral feeders from Barn World: Make sure your livestock is getting nutrition it needs

 

BarnWorld.com

Mineral Feeder Post

The upright mineral feeder from Sioux Steel perfects the balance between protecting the minerals from the elements and providing a constant supply of minerals for your livestock.  With its 360° swiveling, beveled poly hood, it offers aerodynamic directional protection that’s not common in a lot of mineral feeders. This feature alone will save a lot of money from being blown away by the elements.

Upright Mineral Feeder

Below is a short video on the upright mineral feeder from Sioux Steel that shows just how large and how much protection from the elements the mineral feeder offers.

Video Text:

“This is this Sioux Steel upright hooded mineral feeder.  The beveled hood opening is large enough to accommodate horned cattle and the low center of gravity adds to stability.  The 16gauge steel tubular frame is built for stability and strength.  The aerodynamic hood and wind vane aid in directional control.  The free hundred and 60° rotation protects the minerals from the elements.  Mineral feeders can be fun.”

Be sure to head to Barn World.com to view our large selection of mineral feeders and livestock supplies.  Barn World has everything from cattle guards to saddle pads and is your one-stop shop for livestock equipment.

 

Visit www.BarnWorld.com today or call 720-238-2190.

Hay Feeder: Hauling hay with a school bus – ingenuity at work!

 

 

Check out this neat article from Progressive Forage Grower that shows the ingenuity of a farmer in Kansas complete with a video of his hay hauling technique.

Although Barn World doesn’t offer hay haulers like the school bus below, we do have a large selection of hay feeders and other livestock equipment and livestock supplies for your farm and ranch.  Be sure to check out Barn World for everything from saddle pads to cattle guards, to hay feeders.

Learn a new way to haul hay with a school bus PDF Print E-mail
Written by Alisa Anderson
ShareThis
Updated June 23, 2011

Instead of hauling one or two bales at a time with his tractor, David Anderson used his brain to save time.

He converted a school bus into a bale hauler.

Anderson has two bale haulers – a round bale hauler and a square bale hauler. The square bale hauler can pick up and haul 12 three-by-three bales, or eight four-by-four bales, and the round bale hauler can pick up and haul seven to eight round bales.

Two hydraulic arms squeeze the sides of the bale and lift the bale to the “table” on top of the bus cab. The table lifts up at an angle, and the bales slide down to the back of the bed, which is set up at an angle. When you are ready to unload, the forks at the end of the bed drop down, and as you drive away the bales slide off.

“I can mount the hauler on any type of vehicle; you just have to change the angle of the bed and the points of your lift arms,” says Anderson.

Anderson purchased an old school bus from a school district to mount the bale hauler on. The bus has an automatic transmission so the driver won’t wear out the clutch, has a diesel engine, drives faster than a tractor and uses farm-grade diesel.

Used school buses usually don’t cost more than $4,000 and have been kept in excellent condition. Anderson paid $2,000 for his first bus. He says if you use flotation tires, they won’t compact the soil, but Anderson just uses the tires that were on the bus. The flat surface on top of the cab gives the hay hauler good stability, even on a hillside.

Anderson bought a 28-horsepower Kubota engine to independently drive his hydraulics. It uses the same electrical system, generator and fuel tank on the bus, and only uses about a gallon an hour. He installed an electric clutch pump that uses a fan belt to drive the hydraulics. It’s slower than an engine- mounted pump, but also much cheaper.

“I used electric instead of hydraulic so I wouldn’t have to run all the hoses into the cab,” says Anderson.

Anderson is working to build a kit that can be sold at local dealers. Farmers could then buy their own vehicles and mount the hauler on them.

“It’s so time-consuming to just pick up only one or two bales, and drive back and forth and back and forth over the field. This way it just saves time. There are comparable machines on the market, but they’re very expensive,” says Anderson.  FG

For more information and photos e-mail Dsonhay@aol.com

The video was featured in the June 16, 2011 issue of The Jewell County Record and The Superior Express newspapers)